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  1. Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 343
    #1

    to be a mess vs to be in a mess

    1. I'm in a mess. I dont' know what to do.
    2. I'm a mess. I don't know what to do.

    3. She's in a mess. We have to talk to her and help her.
    4. She's a mess. We have to talk to her and help her.

    Are the sentences above correct and natural? If "yes" do they mean the same (1=2 and 3 = 4)?

  2. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 15,248
    #2

    Re: to be a mess vs to be in a mess

    To be in a mess and to be a mess are a little different. The first means that you're involved in a complicated situation; the second means that you don't feel in control of yourself or that you're dissatisfied with your appearance.
    I am not a teacher.

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