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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    Hello.

    I know that "to frown upon" means "to disapprove of".

    I would like, however, to ask you how to use "to frown upon", especially but not only, in the passive voice.

    It is frowned upon for people walking ahead of you to pollute air with cigarettes =? It is frowned when/if/that people walking ahead of you pollute air with cigarettes =? The fact that people walking ahead of you pollute air with cigarettes is frowned upon =? Some frown upon people walking ahead of you polluting air with cigarettes.

    Since "to frown upon somebody doing something" means the same as "to disapprove of somebody doing something", I used this version in the last sentence above.

    Does "to frown upon somebody doing something" mean the same as "to be frown upon for somebody to do something"?

    People frown upon youngsters using profanity on the street.
    or
    It is frowned upon for youngsters to use profanity on the street.

    What do you think of my examples? Please put me right if need be and tell me how the structure "to frown upon" or "to be frowned upon" structure also with the infinitive, is used in reality.

    Thank you.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    If people frown upon something, then that something is frowned upon.

    Polluting the air with cigarette smoke is generally frowned upon.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    You can also say "frowned on" with no difference in meaning or acceptability.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Key Member
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    #4

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    What do you think of my infinitive examples of "frown(ed) upon? Are they acceptable?

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    #5

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    Yes.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Moderator
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    #6

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    If you mean
    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Does "to frown upon somebody doing something" mean the same as "to be frown upon for somebody to do something"?
    No.

  7. Key Member
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    #7

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    First of all I should have written "to be frowned upon for somebody to do something" instead of "to be frown upon for somebody to do something" (my typo).
    Do you object to the structure "to frown upon somebody doing something" or do you disapprove of "to be frown upon for somebody to do something"?
    Does "to frown upon somebody doing something" mean the same as "to be frowned upon for somebody to do something"?
    Which of the examples (infinitives) written by me do you find unacceptable?

  8. Key Member
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    #8

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    I wrote the text too close together in the hope of correcting it later on after pasting it into the thread - unluckily - all in vain.

    Now that I want to step in and separate the crowded text, there is nothing I can do about it.
    But it is better to keep it too close together than too further apart.
    Our PC is ill today.

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    #9

    Re: everything about frown upon and frowned upon

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Do you object to the structure "to frown upon somebody doing something" [No, that's fine.] or do you disapprove of "to be frown upon for somebody to do something"? [You need "to be frowned upon.]

    Does "to frown upon somebody doing something" mean the same as "to be frowned upon for somebody to do something"?
    Which of the examples (infinitives) written by me do you find unacceptable?
    You could write The prohibition-minded ladies frowned on the use of alcohol or Among prohibition-minded ladies, the use of alcohol was frowned on.
    I am not a teacher.

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