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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Force to be exerted/force which is exerted

    This arrangement allows great force to be exerted by the brakes.

    At this sentence, can I replace ''to be exerted'' with ''which is exerted''. Is there any difference between them?

    Thanks for your help!
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 02-May-2017 at 09:31. Reason: Enlarged font to make post readable

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Force to be exerted/force which is exerted

    No. The sentence employs the following verb construction, but in a passive voice.

    to allow something to happen

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: Force to be exerted/force which is exerted

    It's correct as is. This allows (the force to be exerted.) The parenthetical bit is a complete thought.

  4. Junior Member
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    #4

    Re: Force to be exerted/force which is exerted

    Thanks for your answers. I understand it well.

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