Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. student from Thailand
    Guest
    #1

    present perfect and present perfect pregressive

    I wonder about the different between; He has written his novel for the last two years. or He has been writing his novel for the last two year. And one more question about "ice break" or "ice breaking". Thank you.

  2. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #2

    Re: present perfect and present perfect pregressive

    As you write the sentences, there's very little difference in meaning.

    Usually, the difference between present perfect and present perfect progressive is this: the progressive implies that the action is still continuing, or has only this second come to an end: "Where were you? I've been waiting for half an hour!" The present perfect without the progressive means the action is complete: "I've made a cake -- would you like a piece?"

    The phrase "for the last two years" also means the action is still continuing. It's more natural to use the present perfect progressive, but you can sometimes use the present perfect instead. This is especially the case with verbs you don't normally use in the present progressive. For example:

    We usually say "I live in London", not "I am living in London" (although that is also possible).
    We can say either "I have lived in London for five years" or "I have been living in London for five years". It makes no difference.

    In your example, though, we very often use "write" in the present progressive, so it's much better, in this case, to use the present perfect progressive.

    If you omit the phrase "for the last two years", there is a very clear difference in meaning:

    "He has written a novel" -> The novel is complete (and you can probably buy it, or at least he's sent the manuscript to the publisher).

    "He has been writing a novel" -> The novel isn't finished yet, and he is still writing it.

  3. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 1,552
    #3

    Re: present perfect and present perfect pregressive

    Oh -- and as for "ice breaking"...

    Do you mean the phrase "to break the ice"? When two or more people who do not know each other get together for the first time, they may find it difficult to relax and talk to each other. Any strategy that helps people relax a bit is called "breaking the ice". At a seminar, for example, there might be a silly game organised designed to let people say something about themselves and to have a bit of fun so they relax. If you meet a nice person at a party, you might try to think of a good topic of conversation that is interesting and gives the other person a chance to say something; or you might tell them a joke. This is also "breaking the ice".

Similar Threads

  1. i need urgent help
    By nita in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-Sep-2009, 13:13
  2. present perfect tense & present perfect continuous tense
    By *zaizai~love* in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2008, 23:06
  3. Present perfect vs. present perfect continuous
    By diana de las casas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Aug-2005, 04:34
  4. Past Perfect / Present Perfect
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 25-Feb-2005, 17:36
  5. Present Perfect or Present Perfect Progressive
    By Dany in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2004, 14:45

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •