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Thread: run in

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    #1

    run in

    Hello,

    I can not understand the meaning of "run in " in the following sentence:
    Let's run in the new model on a short flight.

    source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/run+in

    Thank you for your time and consideration.

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    #2

    Re: run in

    It's another way to say "break in", which means to use equipment gently before subjecting it to tougher conditions.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: run in

    How formal/common is this way ?

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    #4

    Re: run in

    I've never heard it used that way. It is not commonly used in the circles I run in.
    Perhaps it's more common in the aviation industry.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: run in

    According to dictionary.com, "run in" with that meaning was used in the 1900's. I don't think it is common today but it may be.

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    #6

    Re: run in

    Quote Originally Posted by gurpreetgill4u View Post
    How formal/common is this way ?
    I think "run in" is the usual term in British English. What do our British members say?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: run in

    It sounds quite natural to my ear. It's possible that it might be more likely to be used by people who work with machines, or who think in a more techy way.

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    #8

    Re: run in

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I think "run in" is the usual term in British English. What do our British members say?
    We used to have to run in new cars by not exceeding 40mph for the first thousand miles.

    That doesn't seem to be necessary these days.

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    #9

    Re: run in

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    We used to have to run in new cars by not exceeding 40mph for the first thousand miles.

    That doesn't seem to be necessary these days.
    I would use "break in" but apparently "run in" is how Britons prefer it.

    It is recommended that you don't drive at any one constant speed for the first 500 miles.

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    #10

    Re: run in

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    We used to have to run in new cars by not exceeding 40mph for the first thousand miles.
    We used to have a sign like this in the rear window back then.

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