Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #1

    Quieting vs. quietening

    Here's a good one. To the best of my knowledge, the transitive verbs "to quiet" and "to quieten" convey the same meaning.

    However, I am uncertain as to the use of "down" following both of these.

    Eg. (in connection with an unruly class):
    "The teacher had to keep quieting them down".
    "The teacher had to keep quietening them down."

    Eg. (in relation to a person who has outgrown the partying stage):
    "She has really quieted down since you knew her."
    "She has really quietened down since you knew her."

    Again, since I equate the use of "quiet" here with "settle", I figure down can be used freely with both quiet and quieten (assuming, of course, both verbs can be used in these instances).

    Thanks,
    Bill

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,884
    #2

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    I would, I think, not use 'quiet down' in your examples. I would use it as an imperative or in the infinitive or base forms.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #3

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    Great - thanks, tdol. I'll remove those.

    Have a great weekend!

    Bill

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,884
    #4

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    You too, Bill.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #5

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    My curiosity is piqued...to my mind (and ear) the first sentences in Bill's examples sound fine. (We were always taught - back in the Dark Ages before the Earth's crust had cooled - that "quieten" is not a word, though, so the second sentences sound wrong to me.) How would your rephrase Bill's sample sentences?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,884
    #6

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    Maybe it's a BE thing, but they sound fine to me with 'quieten'. I would say that I told them to quiet down, but I don't think I'd use 'quiet' in the gerund form. Let's see what othe British speakers say.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 250
    #7

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    Wow - I'm in suspenders here myself now! I was beginning to fear I was no longer capable of phrasing simple sentences in English. I'm glad to learn these weren't so "simple" after all.

    Let's see if anyone else can help. Thanks for the responses and suggestions.

    Take care,
    Bill

  2. DavyBCN's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 346
    #8

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    As a BE speaker I agree with tdol's comments. I would use "quiet down" as an imperative, but do not think I have ever used it in other verb forms, where I would use quieten.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,884
    #9

    Re: Quieting vs. quietening

    Davy, glad to have a confirmation of that as I had never considered the question before.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •