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  1. ShadeWe's Avatar
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    #1

    (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    I kind of understand the meaning of in no way and by no means, but there are still some questions:

    Are in no way and by no means interchangeable? Maybe is one of them used mostly in formal conversations?
    Do I need to invert (to create an interrogative sentence) when either of them is in the beginning of a sentence? Something like: "In no way will he go".
    (I understand that actually it's not a question, but It looks like this)

    and several questions in addition:

    How to use no way?
    How to use nohow?

    I would be glad If you explained to me which one is used in formal situations, or maybe they are both colloquial. It'll be certainly great if you provide me some examples :)

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShadeWe View Post
    Are in no way and by no means interchangeable?
    No, "in no way" is stronger; e.g.,
    They're in no way equal.
    They're by no means equal.
    #1 says they are not equal in any aspect. #2 implies they are not equal, but it doesn't exclude some aspects of similarity or even equality.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShadeWe View Post
    Maybe Is one of them, perhaps, used mostly in formal conversations?
    Not really. They're equally formal.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShadeWe View Post
    Do I need to invert (to create an interrogative sentence) when either of them is in the beginning of a sentence? Something like: "In no way will he go".
    (I understand that actually it's not a question, but It looks like this).
    This is not the interrogative. It is a kind of subject-verb inversion. It is commonly used with negative adverbials.
    http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/inversion.html

    No, you don't need to use inversion.
    He will, in no way, accede to those unreasonable demands.
    Those are, by no means, the only problems we faced.

    Quote Originally Posted by ShadeWe View Post
    and several questions in addition:

    How to use no way?
    How to use nohow?
    Please start new threads for those. But before you do so, look them up in the dictionary, and see if you can work out their usage for yourself.

    www.onelook.com

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    He will, in no way, accede to those unreasonable demands.
    Those are, by no means, the only problems we faced.
    I would not use commas in those sentences. They aren't wrong, but I think they break up the flow without adding anything.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    I agree about the flow although I also think they're necessary. They could be reworded (without commas) to:

    In no way will he accede to those unreasonable demands.
    By no means are those the only problems we faced.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    Without the commas, I see "in no way" as an adverbial phrase that modifies the following verb.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    Technically speaking, "ways" and "means" are two different things. One could have a way to do something, but not the means to do so.

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    #7

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Technically speaking, "ways" and "means" are two different things. One could have a way to do something, but not the means to do so.
    That's true but I don't think the nuance extends to the expressions "in no way" and "by no means".
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    I second that. "in no way" and "by no means" are essentially the same and both are informal. "in no way will he go" sounds more empathetic than "he will in no way go". In such short sentences, commas only serve to distract. "He will, in no way, go" -

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    I would add at this point that most BrE native speakers wouldn't say "In no way will he go" or "He will in no way go" (with or without commas!) We'd probably say "There's no way he'll go" or "There's no way he's gonna go!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: (in) no way, by no means, nohow.

    I wouldn't say it myself personally but I can imagine someone shouting across the street "IN NO WAY WILL HE GO".

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