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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Hello.
    There is something I would like to ask you.
    Do we say: there is a leak from a pipe (because the pipe is the source of the leak?)?
    Do we say: there is a leak on a cover (the cover is not the source of the leak).
    What do you think?
    If not, which preposition should "leak" (noun) be followed by and under what circumstances?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Leaks typically come from something. They may go into something else.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    there is a leak from a pipe
    That's possible.


    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    there is a leak on a cover
    That doesn't work for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    If not, which preposition should "leak" (noun) be followed by and under what circumstances?
    That depends on the sentence.

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    #4

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Suppose we have a roof over a bus stop. The roof is holed and the rain is falling on my head through holes. Could I say that there is a leak from the roof?
    Which preposition would you use if water leaked from a cover: there is a leak in/from a cover?
    Last edited by JACEK1; 12-May-2017 at 21:10.

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    #5

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Suppose we have a roof over a bus stop. The roof is holed and the rain is falling on my head through holes. Could I say that there is a leak from the roof?
    It would be more natural to say "The roof is leaking."
    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Which preposition would you use if water leaked from a cover: there is a leak in/from a cover?
    If water were leaking through a cover and dripping into a hold, for example, you could say "Water is leaking from the cover into​ the hold."
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    If there is a pipe that runs above the cover for something (like the cover on a pump or a filter), then you can indeed say that there is a leak from the pipe onto the cover. The cover is where the water ends up. It's not getting inside whatever the cover is covering, but the leak is onto the cover.

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    #7

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Yes, but I do have to use 'leak' as a noun. Which preposition to use when a cover is no longer leak free?

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    #8

    Re: leak from a pipe / on a cover

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Yes, but I do have to use 'leak' as a noun. Which preposition to use when a cover is no longer leak free?
    If the cover is failing, allowing water to run into the space it's covering, you can say "there's a leak from the cover into the space it's covering."
    I am not a teacher.

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