Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 185
    #1

    [American English] mind you

    Mind you, it is a dangerous job. But if you're careful, everyone will be safe.

    It is a pleasant house and, mind you, well built.

    He is dead but, mind you, not forgotten.

    Do Americans use the phrase "mind you"?

  2. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,646
    #2

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Yes, sometimes. The second and third examples are not natural.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 185
    #3

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Do American English speakers use the phrase only at the beginning of a sentence?

  4. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,646
    #4

    Re: [American English] mind you

    I think it's most often used at the beginning of a sentence. The second and third of your sample sentences just don't use the expression right.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Amigos4's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 68,202
    #5

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Quote Originally Posted by Saki6 View Post
    Do American English speakers use the phrase only at the beginning of a sentence?
    No, the phrase does not 'only' have to be at the beginning of a sentence. It can appear elsewhere, as in: She is quite fancy, but mind you, she has got a lot of money to afford it.

  6. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 185
    #6

    Re: [American English] mind you

    It is a pleasant house and, mind you, well built.

    He is dead but, mind you, not forgotten.

    I wonder why these two are not natural.

  7. Amigos4's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 68,202
    #7

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Quote Originally Posted by Saki6 View Post
    It is a pleasant house and, mind you, well built.

    He is dead but, mind you, not forgotten.

    I wonder why these two are not natural.
    The phrase would be natural to a native speaker who hears and uses the phrase frequently. It is my understanding that 'mind you' is more natural in BrE than AmE.
    As a native AmE speaker, I seldom use the phrase 'mind you' in my daily conversations. I tend to be direct by omitting words and phrases that I consider superfluous.

    My preferences for your sentences: (a) It is a pleasant, well built house. (b) He is dead but not forgotten.

  8. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,646
    #8

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Quote Originally Posted by Saki6 View Post
    It is a pleasant house and, mind you, well built.

    He is dead but, mind you, not forgotten.

    I wonder why these two are not natural.
    It doesn't work in the second because it means about the same thing as "but"; it's redundant.

    We'd be more likely to use "mind you" in a sentence like the first to introduce something undesirable about the house: It's a pleasant house. Mind you, you can't get decent broadband out there.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2017
    • Posts: 1,328
    #9

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Quote Originally Posted by Saki6 View Post
    It is a pleasant house and, mind you, well built.

    He is dead but, mind you, not forgotten.

    I wonder why these two are not natural.
    "Mind you" is usually used to introduce a negative. "well built" is not a negative thing so it is not appropriate. I don't use "mind you" often at all in my conversations. Perhaps in writing but not in speech.

  10. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 64,251
    #10

    Re: [American English] mind you

    Mind you works at the end of a sentence too. It can go in the middle, though I think this is less common.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Similar Threads

  1. Threat, Fear and the Tightening of the American Mind
    By GoodTaste in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29-Apr-2016, 07:44
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Mar-2016, 10:32
  3. [General] Quotation Usage in British English and American English
    By Novita S. Dian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Mar-2015, 20:54
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-Aug-2012, 03:38
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Jan-2012, 17:27

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •