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    #1

    The soldier lay low to the ground.

    The soldier lay low to the ground.

    Question 1: In this case, the prepositional phrase ‘to the ground’ functions as an adverbial of degree modifying the adverb ‘low,’ right? (-How low did the soldier lie? -To the ground.)

    Question 2: I’m just wondering if the meaning of the sentence ‘the soldier lay low’ is still complete without the prepositional phrase ‘to the ground.’

    P.S. In this case, ‘lie low’ means to hide so you will not be caught by someone.

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    #2

    Re: The soldier lay low to the ground.

    Please note that I have changed your thread title. Titles should include words/phrases about which you are asking.

    Your sentence is wrong.

    These are correct:

    'The soldier lay low.'
    'The soldier lay on the ground.'
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 15-May-2017 at 12:50.

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    #3

    Re: The soldier lay low to the ground.

    I notice that you posted the same question on WordReference.com at the same time.

    Please do not post the same question on multiple sites at the same time. Post it to one forum and wait for some answers. If you're not satisfied with the answers you get, try another forum, but please provide a link to where you've already asked the question and also indicates what you still don't understand.

    Simultaneously posting a question on multiple forums wastes our time!
    (teechar)

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    #4

    Re: The soldier lay low to the ground.

    Q1: See the answer you were given in your previous thread (with lowest to the ground). The PP here is the complement of low. It is not an adverbial of degree. The complete phrase (low to the ground) is needed to make sense, and expresses the soldier's position.

    Where/How did the soldier lie? Low to the ground.

    However, the meaning of the phrase is incoherent -- there is not really any other way to lie!

    Q2: The sentence would have a different meaning.

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    #5

    Re: The soldier lay low to the ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Q1: See the answer you were given in your previous thread (with lowest to the ground). The PP here is the complement of low. It is not an adverbial of degree. The complete phrase (low to the ground) is needed to make sense, and expresses the soldier's position.

    Where/How did the soldier lie? Low to the ground.

    However, the meaning of the phrase is incoherent -- there is not really any other way to lie!

    Q2: The sentence would have a different meaning.
    Thank you

    The soldier lay low to the ground.


    The soldier.......lay............{..[low]...............................to the ground...................................}
    Subject.......... verb...........{ [adverb]...adverbial prepositional phrase (adjunct) modifying "low".}
    Subject.......... verb...........{.................................. ..adverbial phrase...................................}

    Question 1: In this case, 'lie low' is a verb phrase so 'Subject..........verb...........{[adverb]...adverbial prepositional phrase (adjunct) modifying "low".}' make more sense, right?


    The soldier lay
    Q: How was he lying?
    A: He was lying low.
    Q: How low?
    A: Low to the ground.

    Question 2:

    Q: How low?
    A: Low to the ground.

    Which means, in this case, the adverbial phrase ‘to the ground’ functions as an adverbial of degree modifying the adverb ‘low,’ right?

    Question 3: In this case, 'to the ground' is an adjunct, which means that the meaning of the sentence ‘the soldier lay low’ is still complete without the prepositional phrase ‘to the ground.’Right?

    P.S. In this case, ‘lie low’ is a verb phrase meaning to hide so you will not be caught by someone.

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    #6

    Re: The soldier lay low to the ground.

    This thread is still under discussion in WR.

    I suggest we spend no more time on it here.

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