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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Question Her Majesty's say

    Let's see what will Her Majesty's say be.
    or
    Let's see what will be Her Majesty's say.

    Which form is more correct? Thank you
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 15-May-2017 at 17:24.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: which is better?

    Neither. "Her Majesty", an official title for a queen, can be replaced by "she".

    Let's see what Her Majesty say​s.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: which is better?

    You can say ​Let's see what Her Majesty says.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which is better?

    I'm pretty sure that's what I wrote in post #2, 35 minutes earlier!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    gaetano, please note that I have changed your thread title.

    Extract from the forum's Posting Guidelines:

    Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 15-May-2017 at 17:39.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    In your original sentences, you seem to have tried to use "say" as a noun. It's not. It's a verb.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In your original sentences, you seem to have tried to use "say" as a noun. It's not. It's a verb.
    It's a noun in the expression "to have one's say". For example, The Queen has had her say. A learner may want to be able to recognize this expression but shouldn't try to use it.

    Of course, when the Queen is a Windsor, she never has her say except in private.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Newbie
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    #8

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    Thank you all. But nobody seem to answer my question. I've been finding say as a noun long since in colloquial English, and in the newspapers. Such was the case with the Queen's say, about the recent announcement of Prince Harry's appointment to Captain General, Royal Marines. An appointment Prince Philip is going to stand down from. Further, I've been studying English for over 65 years; I still consider myself a learner, but I can't see why I couldn't use the expression if it does make sense in Eglish. If this worries you, let's replace "say" with "decision". My question remains. Thank you for your attention

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    #9

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    Quote Originally Posted by gaetano View Post
    "Let's see what will Her Majesty's say be."
    or
    "Let's see what will be Her Majesty's say."

    Which form is more correct? Thank you
    Quote Originally Posted by gaetano View Post
    I've been finding "say" as a noun long since in colloquial English, and in the newspapers. "Such was the case with the Queen's say, about the recent announcement of Prince Harry's appointment to Captain General, Royal Marines. An appointment Prince Philip is going to stand down from." Further, I've been studying English for over 65 years; I still consider myself a learner, but I can't see why I couldn't use the expression if it does make sense in English. If this worries you, let's replace "say" with "decision". My question remains.
    Neither of your original sentences was natural. "Decision" is a better choice, but you'll have to rephrase the sentence even with the substitution. You could say "Let's wait for Her Majesty's decision." [EDIT] I just thought of a way to use "say": Let's wait till Her Majesty has her say.

    Remember to surround quoted text, and other text you're discussing, in quotation marks or to set it in italics.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Newbie
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    #10

    Re: Her Majesty's say

    Very sensible suggestion. Thank you. But, just in case I would sound unnatural, which sentence could I be using:
    "Let's wait what will be Her Majesty's decision", or
    "Let's wait what H.M.'s decision will be"?

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