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  1. VIP Member
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    #1

    As a stand-up came up on the stage

    I am wondering if my sentence sounds natural. I used just "a stand-up" instead of adding "comedian".

    As a stand-up came up on the stage, illuminated by a single spotlight, the audience held its breath.

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    #2

    Re: As a stand-up came up on the stage

    I'd write "stand-up comedian".
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: As a stand-up came up on the stage

    Your sentence doesn't sound natural. Robert was right though.

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: As a stand-up came up on the stage

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    In the right circles it's fine, Bassim, e.g, late night TV comedy shows and the entertainment world in general. Every attendee at the 'Academy Awards' would know what this means. A guy by the name of 'George Carlin' was one of the best stand-ups of all time.
    The world in which RobertJ said it is fine is a pretty wide world: i.e. all those people who understand the culture of American late night television. For many of us, including me, that is a huge majority.

    Therefore I would say that the OP's "a stand-up" sounds natural. I knew instantly what he meant, and I think that many many millions did too.

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    #5

    Re: As a stand-up came up on the stage

    Even though the word stand-up is pretty universally understood as a stand-up comedian, it can still cause confusion among some people. For example, if someone said to me "he is one of the best stand-ups in the country", I would know exactly what he was referring to. But if someone pointed me to someone on the corner of the street and asked "do you see that stand-up?", my mind would not immediately go to a stand-up comedian. Part of it could be because our town rarely sees a celebrity if ever. The OP is okay but I still prefer "a stand-up comedian".

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