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    #1

    The hospital has no vacant beds.

    1. The hospital has no vacant beds.
    2. There are no vacant beds in the hospital.

    Are the sentences above correct and natural. Do they have the same meaning?

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    #2

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Yes, yes, and yes.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    I wonder If I said:

    1. The hospital has no free beds.
    2. There are no free beds in the hospital.

    Would the sentences be correct?

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    #4

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Without context, I'd guess that "free" meant "unoccupied" here. However, it can also mean "gratis, costing no money", and could mean that in this sentence.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Without context, I'd guess that "free" meant "unoccupied" here.
    You guessed right.


    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    However, it can also mean "gratis, costing no money", and could mean that in this sentence.
    So in such a case, it's better to use "vacant", because the word is unequivocal?

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    #6

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by kompstar View Post
    So in such a case, it's better to use "vacant", because the word is unequivocal?
    Yes, absolutely.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by kompstar View Post
    So in such a case, is it's better to use "vacant", because the word is unequivocal?
    See above. Questions always require subject-verb inversion.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Or "empty beds".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by kompstar View Post
    So in such a case, it's better to use "vacant", because the word is unequivocal?
    If you are talking about a system that doesn't charge, then the meaning is clear. If not, then it is ambiguous.

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    #10

    Re: The hospital has no vacant beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Or "empty beds".
    I never would have thought I could say "There are no empty beds in the hospital" instead of "There are no vacant beds in the hospital". Which of the sentences is more commonly used (with "empty" or "vacant")?

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