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    #1

    After the bus passed by a bus stop without stopping

    I am wondering if my sentence is grammatically correct. Is it correct to write "impatient to get warm"?

    After the bus passed by a bus stop without stopping, Bob frozen and impatient to get warm, spewed out a series of curses and insults.

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    #2

    Re: After the bus passed by a bus stop without stopping

    "Impatient to get warm" is OK. The sentence doesn't establish that Bob is waiting at the bus stop; the reader has to guess that. You could revise it: Bob, shivering and impatient to get warm after waiting at the bus stop for a frozen half-hour, cursed and insulted the oblivious driver as the bus flew by without stopping.
    I am not a teacher.

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