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Thread: Merit/That of

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    #1

    Merit/That of

    1.The success of a speech is often attributed to the skill of the speaker, with merit being given to speakers who are confident, articulate, knowledgeable and able to deliver a speech with conviction.

    with merit being given <~~~ What does it mean?


    2. But often it is not the speakers who write these moving speeches, it is a speechwriter. And one industry in which this practise is common is that of politics.

    What does "that" refer to? I don't understand the structure of this sentence.

    source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/china/learninge...hwriting.shtml
    Last edited by Maybo; 23-May-2017 at 14:07.
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know! Please! Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Merit/That of

    Quote Originally Posted by Maybo View Post
    ... with merit being given ... What does it mean?
    It's an adverbial. It means and merit is given. However, I would remove "being" from that sentence.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maybo View Post
    2. But often it is not the speakers who write these moving speeches, it is a speechwriter. And one industry in which this practise is common is that of politics. What does "that" refer to? I don't understand the structure of this sentence.
    "That" refers to "industry." One industry in which this practise is common is the industry of politics. Simplifying it, we get: One industry in which this practise is common is politics. This is common in English.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note that the part below contains a comma splice.
    But often it is not the speakers who write these moving speeches, it is a speechwriter.
    That comma is wrong. It should be replaced with a semicolon or a full stop (period).

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    #3

    Re: Merit/That of

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    It's an adverbial. It means and merit is given. However, I would remove "being" from that sentence.
    Does merit here mean praise?
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know! Please! Thank you!

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    #4

    Re: Merit/That of

    Yes.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: Merit/That of

    No. Merit does not mean praise. It means something that deserves praise.

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    #6

    Re: Merit/That of

    In Maybo's sentence, it is the skills of the speakers that deserve praise. The merit in that sentence is the credit/praise/reward/recognition given to the speaker.

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    #7

    Re: Merit/That of

    In Maybo's sentence, merit means the praiseworthy quality (the skill of the speaker) is being given to the speaker. Merit never directly means praise .

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    #8

    Re: Merit/That of

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewg927 View Post
    In Maybo's sentence, merit means the praiseworthy quality (the skill of the speaker) is being given to the speaker.
    That doesn't make sense.

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    #9

    Re: Merit/That of

    Well, you have to be careful because if you say merit means praise, it gives the false impression that they are interchangeable but they are not. I was trying to distinguish the difference between them.

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    #10

    Re: Merit/That of

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewg927 View Post
    In Maybo's sentence, merit means the praiseworthy quality (the skill of the speaker) is being given to the speaker. Merit never directly means praise .
    Who give the speakers these praiseworthy quality?
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know! Please! Thank you!

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