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  1. Member
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    #1

    Is " I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant" grammatically correct?

    The sentence is made by me in an effort to translate a sentence in Chinese written by Echo or San Mao.
    Another sentence I'm not sure about goes as following.
    "What is regretful is that we donít cherish what we have when having it and love will have turned into dust when looked back on." It is also made by me.


    Any reply would be appreciated. Thank you all.

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    #2

    Re: Is " I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant" grammatically correct?

    The title sentence, "I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant", is not grammatical. Maybe you mean "It seemed so tranquil that it was nearly elegant," though that doesn't make much sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by on the way View Post
    "What is regretful is that we don’t cherish what we have when having it and love will have turned into dust when looked back on." It is also made by me.
    This one is closer to working. You may mean to say "What is sad is that we don't cherish what we have when we have it; and love, remembered, turns to dust." I purposely used the conjunction "and" after the semicolon. Your teachers may think that's wrong.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Member
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    #3

    Re: Is " I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant" grammatically correct?

    I really appreciate your reply. I have only one question now. I was told that in some sentences,if the subject of the subordinate clause is the same as that of the main clause, then the subordinate clause can be simplifed most of the time. For instance , in "when we stand at the top of the mountain, we will have a clear bird's-eye view of the village below", the time clause could be simplified like "when standing at the top of the mountain". Another case can be seen in the admirable sentece made by you "love, (when it is) remembered, turns to dust. So why couldn't "when we have it " be simplified as "when having it"? Thank you very much again.
    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The title sentence, "I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant", is not grammatical. Maybe you mean "It seemed so tranquil that it was nearly elegant," though that doesn't make much sense.


    This one is closer to working. You may mean to say "What is sad is that we don't cherish what we have when we have it; and love, remembered, turns to dust." I purposely used the conjunction "and" after the semicolon. Your teachers may think that's wrong.

  4. VIP Member
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    #4

    Re: Is " I felt it was so calm as close to be elegant" grammatically correct?

    I can't put my finger on why, but somehow the subject of the second clause is unclear to me in "we don’t cherish what we have when having it".
    I am not a teacher.

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