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Thread: With the comma

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    #1

    With the comma

    Hello Teachers,

    "Conor McGregor is keen to face Floyd Mayweather, who won all 49 of his fights from 1996-2015."


    In the above sentence, the relative cause is meant to be referred to Floyd Mayweather. Is it correct grammatically to use a comma to achieve such effect or without?

    Please enlighten me!

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: With the comma

    Quote Originally Posted by Vking View Post
    the relative cause is meant to be referred to Floyd Mayweather. Is it correct grammatically to use a comma to achieve such effect or without?
    The comma is required before a non-defining relative clause such as this.

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    #3

    Re: With the comma

    Thank you for that!

    On the other hand, would the sentence carry a different meaning if the comma is omitted?

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    #4

    Re: With the comma

    Quote Originally Posted by Vking View Post

    ... would the sentence carry a different meaning if the comma is was omitted?
    It would be incorrect

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    #5

    Re: With the comma

    This would be correct without the comma:

    "Conor McGregor is keen to face the man who won all 49 of his fights from 1996-2015."

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    #6

    Re: With the comma

    Thanks for both answers!

    But why should my question be 'was', as I am talking in the present tense?

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    #7

    Re: With the comma

    You have used 'would' in the main clause, making this a question about a hypothetical situation. The verb in the if- clause needs to be distanced in reality; 'is' becomes 'was' or, for the purist, 'were'.

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    #8

    Re: With the comma

    Thank you! The answer has clarified a lot of questions for me.

    One more question, if I asked the question in a different way as follows: " Will it make any difference if the comma is omitted ?" ,is it correct?
    Last edited by Vking; 26-May-2017 at 19:12. Reason: correct mis-spell

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    #9

    Re: With the comma

    That wording is correct. Don't put a space after an opening quotation mark or before a question mark or a comma.
    I am not a teacher.

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