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Thread: Tenses

  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Tenses

    "Look at the mirror, if you went on eating so much, I'm sure you would get fat easily. "

    The above sentence is quoted from a grammar workbook.

    I don't understand why do they use (went) and (would) since it has not happened yet ?

    Can anyone help, please?

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tenses

    The text you quoted has a comma splice. Can you please tell us the source?

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    #3

    Re: Tenses

    What aspect of grammar is this sentence illustrating?

  4. Key Member
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    #4

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    The text you quoted has a comma splice. Can you please tell us the source?
    What is comma splice, please ?

    It's from a ordinary workbook from an infamous publication I bought from a book store.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Tenses

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    What is comma splice, please ?

    It's from a ordinary workbook from an infamous publication I bought from a book store.
    A comma splice is when you (incorrectly) use a comma to join two independent clauses. You can get more information by Googling it or by looking in a good grammar book.

    You need to give us the title of the book and the author. We are not being nosy - you must give people credit for their writing if you quote it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. teechar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Tenses

    Note also that "infamous" does not mean not famous.

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