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    #1

    South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    We have never heard nor studied about "South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist. That is the area of ship borne business worth $5 trillion. It is a water way used by countries for doing business.

    Please check my sentences.

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    #2

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Quite apart from errors in grammar, this makes little sense. You say that you have not heard about it and that it doesn't exist, and then you say what it is.

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    #3

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Quite apart from errors in grammar, this makes little sense. You say that you have not heard about it and that it doesn't exist, and then you say what it is.
    We have never heard nor studied about "South China Sea"(can't we use nor like this?). It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

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    #4

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Write the South China Sea. The second sentence is grammatically correct but contradictory - if it's a geographical presence then it does in fact exist.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    This is the Wikipedia entry for the South China Sea. You could have found that out yourself by Googling it. The fact that you haven't learnt about something doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 31-May-2017 at 22:30. Reason: Fixing typo
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Tufguy, when the international flashpoint that is the South China Sea erupts into armed conflict, you'll learn about it then I suppose.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #7

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Write the South China Sea. The second sentence is grammatically correct but contradictory - if it's a geographical presence then it does in fact exist.
    We have never heard nor studied about "the South China Sea". I asked about this sentence. Is it correct to use "nor" like this?

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    #8

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Yes, it is. Most Americans would use or but "nor" is fine.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    We have never heard nor studied about "the South China Sea". I asked about this sentence. Is it correct to use "nor" like this?
    The beginning of the sentence doesn't work. By writing "We have never heard nor studied about ...", you are basically saying "We have never heard about nor studied about ...".
    The use of "about" is wrong for the first verb - it should be "heard of". The second verb ("studied") doesn't require "about".

    "We have neither heard of nor studied the South China Sea" is grammatical.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: South China Sea". It is a geographical presence that doesn't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The beginning of the sentence doesn't work. By writing "We have never heard nor studied about ...", you are basically saying "We have never heard about nor studied about ...".
    The use of "about" is wrong for the first verb - it should be "heard of". The second verb ("studied") doesn't require "about".

    "We have neither heard of nor studied the South China Sea" is grammatical.

    Okay so we can't say "I studied about life". We say "I studied life" or "I studied life from that book". Is it correct?

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