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  1. monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    #1

    Arrow RE: Formality-type Question

    Hi folks,

    I understand that you have 'formal' and 'informal' texts. For instance, a job interview letter would be formal, whereas a letter to a (say) local library would be 'informal'. These both fall under 'Transactional Writing' - I am certain you know this already!

    However, I am unclear as to how to classify the same parameters within the contexts of 'fiction/non-fiction' stories.

    For example, I am working through some GSCE pass-papers and one of the questions (relating to the text: "The Yellow Wallpaper" - Charlotte Perkins) asks if the writing is 'formal' or 'informal'. Because there is no slang, apostrophes or abbreviations then I assumed the story is 'formal'? That is my logical thinking, but admittedly this is not concrete.

    In short, could one assume that most '19thC Classics' are all 'formal' writings (eg. Invisible Man, Jane Eyre, Pride & Prejudice) for the simple reason that their respective authors were accomplished in their field and that a 'formal' style was very much appropriate for this particular genre?

    Many thanks in advance for any kind assistance offered here . . .

    Ta,

    Paul
    Last edited by monsterjazzlicks; 02-Jun-2017 at 18:06. Reason: Spelling

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Formality-type Question

    It would be hard for us to say whether the text in the GCSE paper was formal or informal without seeing it. Can you post an excerpt?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Formality-type Question

    Quote Originally Posted by monsterjazzlicks View Post
    I understand that you have 'formal' and 'informal' texts. For instance, a job interview letter would be formal, whereas a letter to a (say) local library would be 'informal'.
    I would not agree that a letter to a local library is necessarily informal. It is the style and register of the text rather than the purpose that are among the things we bear in mind when we assess formality.
    In short, could one assume that most '19thC Classics' are all 'formal' writings (eg. Invisible Man, Jane Eyre, Pride & Prejudice) for the simple reason that their respective authors were accomplished in their field and that a 'formal' style was very much appropriate for this particular genre?
    It's probably safe to say that the narrative sections of 19th century novels now considered classics were written in a formal style.
    However, one could not use 'formal' of the dialogues of some of the characters in the novels of, for example, Hardy or Dickens.

  4. monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Formality-type Question

    Piscean,

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I would not agree that a letter to a local library is necessarily informal. It is the style and register of the text rather than the purpose that are among the things we bear in mind when we assess formality.

    It's probably safe to say that the narrative sections of 19th century novels now considered classics were written in a formal style.

    However, one could not use 'formal' of the dialogues of some of the characters in the novels of, for example, Hardy or Dickens.
    Thanks for your response.

    Regarding a correspondence, I suppose you could could leave your (say) milkman a note saying:

    Dear Sir of Cream Cows,

    May I please request a single pint of milk this morning.

    Yours faithfully,

    John Jones

    That would be 'formal'!

    I will post a copy of a 19thC text shortly.

    Ta,

    Paul

  5. monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Formality-type Question

    EMSR,

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It would be hard for us to say whether the text in the GCSE paper was formal or informal without seeing it. Can you post an excerpt?
    Thanks for your response. Here is a quick extract as requested:

    He seems very queer sometimes, and even Jennie has an inexplicable look.
    It strikes me occasionally, just as a scientific hypothesis,--that perhaps it is the paper!
    I have watched John when he did not know I was looking, and come into the room suddenly on the most innocent excuses, and I've caught him several times LOOKING AT THE PAPER! And Jennie too. I caught Jennie with her hand on it once.
    She didn't know I was in the room, and when I asked her in a quiet, a very quiet voice, with the most restrained manner possible, what she was doing with the paper--she turned around as if she had been caught stealing, and looked quite angry--asked me why I should frighten her so!
    Then she said that the paper stained everything it touched, that she had found yellow smooches on all my clothes and John's, and she wished we would be more careful!
    Did not that sound innocent? But I know she was studying that pattern, and I am determined that nobody shall find it out but myself!

    Life is very much more exciting now than it used to be. You see I have something more to expect, to look forward to, to watch. I really do eat better, and am more quiet than I was.
    John is so pleased to see me improve! He laughed a little the other day, and said I seemed to be flourishing in spite of my wall-paper.

    ("The Yellow Wallpaper" - Charlotte Perkins).

    Ta,

    Paul
    Last edited by monsterjazzlicks; 03-Jun-2017 at 12:31.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Formality-type Question

    It's certainly not informal, but I would call it 'standard' rather than 'formal', particularly for the time at which it was written.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 03-Jun-2017 at 11:29.

  7. monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Formality-type Question

    Piscean,

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It's certainly not informal, but I would call it 'standard' rather than 'formal', particularly for the time at which it was written.
    Cheers.

    Is 'standard' an accepted literary classification term please? I too was looking for a term somewhere between the two polar opposites. I was thinking: 'less formal'?

    Ta,

    Paul

  8. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Formality-type Question

    There are no universally accepted criteria for such terms as slang, colloquial, informal, neutral, standard, semi-formal, formal, etc. If you are working towards your examination with a teacher, I suggest you ask him/her what terms the examination board accepts, and how they are used.

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: Formality-type Question

    Quote Originally Posted by monsterjazzlicks View Post
    Is 'standard' an accepted literary classification term please?
    It is, as far as I know, more a term used to describe the grammatical content of something than a literary term. In this case, there is language like queer, which is not a formal word, so I guess that Piscean is using it to pitch somewhere between formal and colloquial.

  10. monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Formality-type Question

    Piscean,

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    There are no universally accepted criteria for such terms as slang, colloquial, informal, neutral, standard, semi-formal, formal, etc. If you are working towards your examination with a teacher, I suggest you ask him/her what terms the examination board accepts, and how they are used.
    We have been on half-term all week and the GCSE exam is on Monday coming.

    These questions I have been asking have cropped up during my recent private revision time. It is not essential that I gain ultimate answers, however, I would be good to walk into the exam room having a little more ammunition.

    Ta,

    Paul

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