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  1. #1
    fenglish is offline Member
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    Question The principle of the business has an office in New York

    Hi,

    I found the following definition of "principal" from Longman dictionary:

    3. BUSINESS[countable] American English the main person in a business or organization, who can make important business decisions and is legally responsible for them

    The principal of the business has an office in New York.
    According to the definition, we know the "principal" is a person in the above example sentence.

    Can I just simply say "The principal has an office in New York"?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by fenglish; 05-Jun-2017 at 07:54. Reason: Correct the typo: "principle" -> "principal"

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: The principle of the business has an office in New York

    I wouldn't use principal for a business. Businesses have CEOs, chairs, presidents, etc, but schools and colleges have principals. Few businesses have principles.

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