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    #1

    "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    I am in a on-going discussion with my someone who insists that the word, "ends" (verb) is a period of time prior to the end. English is his second language but he boasts that that it is common knowledge that the universal word, "ends" is a time period prior to an end and challenged me to seek an expert to confirm this, He insists that anyone I consult with, would agree with him in his conclusion and logic that the verb format of "ends" is a period of time. He makes this conclusion from the definition of "ends" formatted as a verb.

    verb
    3rd person present: ends



    A strange example he offered me was: The phrase, "OFFER ENDS", he made this bizarre claim that "OFFER ENDS" refers to the valid period of time prior to the "end" of the offer. Now, I think he is very confused or maybe delusional with how nouns and verbs work in the English language. But I need a second opinion.

    QUESTION: I would like to ask, if anyone would agree with his conclusion that "ends" (verb) constitutes a period of time before the end?

    Any feedback would be helpful. Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    Welcome to the forum, kaleiapuno.

    The phrase OFFER ENDS, seen in a store or advertisement, is always followed by a date. It means 'This offer comes to an end on the date specified, after which the product will cost more'.

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    #3

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    Thank you, Rover_KE.

    Another phrase we've been arguing about is regarding "ends of the earth". If the word, "ends" here is used as a verb, how should him or I understand the phrase "ends of the earth" (such as in the phrase "OFFER ENDS" where an offer comes to an end at a specified date)?

    His claim with the phrase, "ends of the earth" is that it is a period of time before the (temporal) end of the earth. Is this correct?

    Regards,
    Kaleiapuno
    Last edited by kaleiapuno; 06-Jun-2017 at 13:48.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    In "ends of the earth", "ends" is a plural noun.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    In the idiom 'the ends of the earth', 'ends' is a plural noun.

    Click here to read its meaning and bookmark the website for your future reference.

    (crossposted)

  6. teechar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    The Earth is (roughly) spherical and has no ends, but people didn't know that in the olden days.

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    #7

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    Thank you, Rover_KE.

    I want to really educated my friend regarding this phrase/idiom that it refers to (the farthest reaches of the planet) as I feel he is misguided regarding basic English and the functions of nouns and verbs, singular and plural etc...

    So for clarification purposes, if "ends" is a plural noun in the idiom, "ends of the earth". In under any circumstance can this plural noun ("ends") be a verb in the idiom, "ends of the earth" to constitute as a temporal "ends" of the earth or what my friend calls a period of time before the "end of the earth"? (i.e. earth's demise or destruction)

    (My apologies if this question sounds strange...)

    QUESTION: Is their the slightest chance that the plural noun "ends" in the idiom is a reference to a specific period of time prior to the end/demise of the earth?

    Thanks,
    Kaleiapuno

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    #8

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    No. There is no possibility for "ends" to be a verb in "ends of the earth".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. Member
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    #9

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Welcome to the forum, kaleiapuno.

    The phrase OFFER ENDS, seen in a store or advertisement, is always followed by a date. It means 'This offer comes to an end on the date specified, after which the product will cost more'.
    And I guess kaleiapuno's friend would argue if it says "Sale ends next Wednesday" that the 24 hours of Wednesday is his period of time. Although equally he may argue that the process of ending has already begun.

    But if it says "Sale ends at midnight" then we are talking about a point on the time axis.

    kaleiapuno could that be where the confusion arises?



  10. teechar's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "Ends" as a verb, need clarification.

    Quote Originally Posted by kaleiapuno View Post
    Is their there the slightest chance that the plural noun "ends" in the idiom is a reference to a specific period of time prior to the end/demise of the Earth?
    .

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