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  1. #1
    inase's Avatar
    inase is offline Member
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    the rich vs. the deceased

    "The" + adjective denotes rich people and takes plural verbs such as:

    The rich are not necessarily happy.

    "The deceased" may usually mean a dead person and takes singular verbs.

    The deceased was fond of bouquet flowers.

    This seems to be an exception to the basic rule that "the" + adjective is plural.

    There are two questions I would like to ask assuming the above is correct:
    1. Is there any example of "the deceased" being plural?
    2. Is "the deceased" the only example of "the" + adjective being singular?

    Inase

  2. #2
    YAMATO2201 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: the rich vs. the deceased

    Quote Originally Posted by inase View Post
    1. Is there any example of "the deceased" being plural?
    Three of the deceased are being buried today. (Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary)

    Quote Originally Posted by inase View Post
    2. Is "the deceased" the only example of "the" + adjective being singular?
    The accused was found innocent. (Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
    All the accused have pleaded guilty. (Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: the rich vs. the deceased

    It's driven by context- does it refer to an individual/group or universally? In most contexts, this usage does refer to a group, but it is not universal.

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