Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Johnyxxx is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,417

    Coney and curry

    Hello,

    Can anybody tell me what the bold text means?

    ĎBesides, we had had words again, and though I can stretch a point with a friend and no harm done, Iím not a man to come coneying and currying favour. Let him get his own drinks, was my feeling in the matter. And you can hardly call me to blame if he did. There was the pantry window hanging wide open in the shade of the trees Ė and day after day of scorching sun and not a breath to breathe. And there was the ruin of him within armís reach from outside, and a water tap handy, too. Very inviting, Iíll allow.

    Crewe, Walter de la Mare, 1929

    Thank you.
    Not a Teacher. A guy who is fond of old horror and weird literature and who is interested in English language.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,237

    Re: Coney and curry

    I have no idea about "coneying" but "to curry favour" is a fairly common phrase.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •