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  1. #1
    JACEK1 is offline Key Member
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    I took the precautions of taking an umbrella vs I took an umbrella just in case

    Hello.
    Does "I took the precautions of taking an umbrella" mean the same as "I took an umbrella just in case" or "I took an umbrella in case it might rain"?
    Does "She took the precautions of packing extra medicine for the trip" mean "She packed extra medicine for the trip just in case" or "She packed extra medicine for the trip in case she might need it"?
    What is your opinion?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: I took the precautions of taking an umbrella vs I took an umbrella just in case

    It's "I took the precaution of ..." (singular noun). Yes, it means the same as "I took an umbrella in case [it rained]" (not "it might rain"). The same applies to your second example.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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