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  1. #1
    Rezafo's Avatar
    Rezafo is offline Junior Member
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    Can I use this collocation, a pang of lonliness?

    Hello,

    Based on the definition of the word "pang" as "pain", can I say "A pang of loneliness"? as in:

    "As his train was fading away in the horizon, she felt a pang of loneliness".

    Also, is a pang of homesick, of misery, and such like adjectives possible?

  2. #2
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    Re: Can I use this collocation, a pang of lonliness?

    Yes, but I wouldn't use 'fading away' for a train. 'Disappearing' would be better.
    Yes, you can have all those types of pang. Which are the adjectives you're referring to?

  3. #3
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    Re: Can I use this collocation, a pang of lonliness?

    No, you can't use a pang of with adjectives, only nouns: She felt a pang of homesickness.

    (misery is a noun, but pang doesn't work with misery.)

  4. #4
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    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Can I use this collocation, a pang of lonliness?

    "A pang of loneliness" (you made a spelling mistake which might have affected some answers)

    "As his train was fading away in the horizon, she felt a pang of loneliness".
    I think this is a great sentence except I would change "in" to "to". You would be showing the direction of the train by this preposition.

    As his train was fading away to the horizon, she felt a pang of loneliness.

    "Pang"as you say is a pain but it is a sharp pain of imagination, that usually lasts for a short duration .

    You can only use this formation "pang of..." with nouns. Every dictionary I have seen has "loneliness" defined as a noun so it is fine in your sentence.

    "A pang of homesick" is wrong but "a pang of homesickness" is fine
    .

    "A pang of misery" is technically correct since misery is a noun but does not sound very good to a native English speaker.

    I would probably reconstruct the sentence this way in place of misery

    She felt miserable, as his train was fading away to the horizon.

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