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  1. #1
    warmwinter is offline Newbie
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    Decide

    I have just found the following sentence in YouTube's subtitle:

    He examined the boy, and decided that there was just a chance of bringing him to life.

    Meanwhile I have another sentence I wrote down a couple of months ago, that is:

    She decided she liked Old Ben.


    To me, above two "decide" looked strange, because they don't make decision.

    Am I right thinking they mean "be sure" ?

    She decided she liked Old Ben =She was sure she liked Old Ben
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 12-Jun-2017 at 16:02. Reason: Fixed formatting across one line

  2. #2
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Decide

    Quote Originally Posted by warmwinter View Post
    I have just found the following sentence in some YouTube's subtitles:
    "He examined the boy, and decided that there was just a chance of bringing him to life."

    Meanwhile I have another sentence I wrote down a couple of months ago, that which is:
    "She decided she liked Old Ben."


    To me, above two "decide" looked looks strange in those sentences (no comma here) because they the people don't didn't make a decision.

    Am I right in thinking they mean "be sure"? No, they don't mean the same thing.

    She decided she liked Old Ben = She was sure she liked Old Ben​.

    Welcome to the forum.

    In both cases, "decide" is absolutely fine. In the first, "he" presumably examined the boy whilst asking himself "Is there a chance of bringing him [back] to life?" The possible answers are "Yes" and "No". He decided that the answer was "Yes, there is a chance".
    The same sort of explanation applies to the second. She probably thought about it for a while - "Do I like Ben? Don't I like Ben?" and eventually came to the decision that she did like him. If she couldn't make up her mind, she would be able to say "I can't decide if I like Ben or not".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is online now VIP Member
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    Re: Decide

    Good question. You are correct in noticing that they don't really mean 'make a decision' in the normal sense of choosing.

    In both cases here, decided means something like 'came to the conclusion'.

  4. #4
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    Re: Decide

    I agree with jutfrank that it effectively means "came to the conclusion" but I think the use of "decide" in both suggests that there was a period of contemplation undertaken before they reached their respective conclusions.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: Decide

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I think the use of "decide" in both suggests that there was a period of contemplation undertaken before they reached their respective conclusions.
    Yes, for sure.

  6. #6
    warmwinter is offline Newbie
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    Re: Decide

    Teachers, thank you.

    I understand.

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: Decide

    warmwinter, there is no need to write a new post just to say "Thank you". Simply click on the "Thank" button at the bottom left-hand corner of any post you find helpful. It saves everybody's time.

  8. #8
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    Re: Decide

    Quote Originally Posted by warmwinter View Post
    I have just found the following sentence in the subtitle of a YouTube video. 's subtitle:
    .

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