Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Markchoi1992 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26

    uncountable and plural noun problems

    I have just studied some grammar but I found something I was very confused.

    Why some uncountable nouns contains a plural form? For example: pressure, should be an abstract noun, can be a plural noun.

    In addition to this, some plural nouns, like relations, forces, affairs which are the exact the same meanings as the countable noun of them, and my question are what is this difference in or when we use plural nouns?

    For example
    1, I need to deal with my relation.
    2. I need to deal with my relations.

    1. I have pressures
    2. I have pressure

    Which one is correct?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    13,525

    Re: uncountable and plural noun problems

    Some "uncountable" nouns are countable in some uses. I'm not sure why you think "pressure" is uncountable.

    I'm not sure why you think "affair" and "affairs" would have the same meaning.

  3. #3
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14,923

    Re: uncountable and plural noun problems

    Look at it like this: The label 'uncountable' describes the use of the word in the sentence.

    Uncountable nouns are always singular in form. (There may be some rare exceptions.)

    If the word contains a plural 's', then you know that it can't be uncountable. So if you see the noun pressures, you know that it must be an example of a plural, and therefore countable use.

    Try not to think of nouns as being always uncountable. Like I say, it depends on the use.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    74,047

    Re: uncountable and plural noun problems

    Many nouns can be used countably and uncountably. Try to think of these as being flexible characteristics rather than an absolute quality of the noun.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •