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  1. #1
    svetlana14 is offline Member
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    A pint of lager

    Dear All,

    Please listen to the beginning of the video below. It seems to me that the speak is saying "a pint of lager" in the way that "of" is dropped. Am I right? Thank you.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LruD-pntoBE

  2. #2
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: A pint of lager

    It isn't dropped altogether. Pint of comes out sounding like "pine a", more or less, though the vowel in pine is a bit different from the one in pint.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    svetlana14 is offline Member
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Thank you. Does it mean that "of" is pronounced roughly like "a" in that case?

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Yes, it often is. Here, they're also using the glottal stop which makes the /t/ virtually silent. The glottal stop is common in some regions, especially London.

  5. #5
    svetlana14 is offline Member
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Yes, it often is. Here, they're also using the glottal stop which makes the /t/ virtually silent. The glottal stop is common in some regions, especially London.
    Thank you. Please giveme some more exaple when "of" turns into "a" in fast speech. Thank you.

  6. #6
    GoesStation is online now Moderator
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    Re: A pint of lager

    It can happen in lots of places:

    I'm kinda angry.
    He's not that kinda guy.
    Wanna get a bucket-a chicken?
    ("Do you want to get a bucket of [fried] chicken?")
    I'll have a cuppa coffee.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Quote Originally Posted by svetlana14 View Post
    Please give me some more examples when "of" turns into "a" in fast speech.
    Pretty much anywhere- it is a common feature of fast speech.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Get outta here.
    Nine outta six.
    I'll have a cuppa tea.
    Have you got the four o' diamonds? (Sounds like "foura diamonds").

    You will have stumbled across a very common example when telling the time. In "five o'clock", "o'clock" is a shortened form of "of the clock", so in that case "of the" is pronounced "uh".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. #9
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    Re: A pint of lager

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It isn't dropped altogether. Pint of comes out sounding like "pine a", more or less, though the vowel in pine is a bit different from the one in pint.
    I agree that it isn't dropped entirely in this recording, but it could be without damaging the meaning. That schwa between "pint" and "lager" can be so slight as to almost vanish.

  10. #10
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    Re: A pint of lager

    This just goes to show one shouldn't rush through one's pints. Sip, don't quaff.

    Take it slow, pronounce it carefully, and enjoy the taste.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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