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  1. #1
    fbs88italy is offline Newbie
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    Forevermore usage

    Hi all,
    is this sentence correct?

    "I cannot do this forevermore".

    Beside the fact that I'm not even sure if the correct one is "forevermore" or "forever more", but this doesn't sound right to me. What I want to say is "I cannot do this forever", does it work the same? If not, how do I use "forevermore" in a sentence?

    It's for a song, so please I just need a binary answer.

    Thanks!
    Fabio
    Last edited by fbs88italy; 05-Jul-2017 at 13:58.

  2. #2
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    The word forevermore is archaic. Say I can't ever do this again or I can never do this again.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 05-Jul-2017 at 23:00. Reason: Evict a stray word.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    You might see it in literary texts, meaning from that point until the end of time. It's similar to forever and ever.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    "I can't do this forever" doesn't mean the same as "I can't ever do this again".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    Quote Originally Posted by fbs88italy View Post

    It's for a song, so please I just need a binary answer.
    If by that you mean 'a yes or no answer', then yes. You can write anything you like in song lyrics. If challenged, call it poetic licence.

    Click here to read how people use the word in a variety of contexts. (Bookmark the site for future reference.)

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    You can do pretty much anything in a song- if it fits the tune and sounds OK, it will probably work.

  7. #7
    fbs88italy is offline Newbie
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    You can do pretty much anything in a song- if it fits the tune and sounds OK, it will probably work.
    Sure, but I prefer to say correct things, since is not my native language!

  8. #8
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    If you want a binary answer, I'd say 'no'. You should say I can't do this forever. If you use forevermore, it's not right.

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Forevermore usage

    Quote Originally Posted by fbs88italy View Post
    Sure, but I prefer to say correct things, since is not my native language!
    Here are some famous cases:

    If you judge a book by the cover, then you judge the look by the lover. (ABC- The Look of Love- he means the exact opposite, but he's got a rhyme)

    But if this ever changing world in which we live in (Paul McCartney, Live and Let Die- he's going overboard on his prepositions here, but it fits and most don't notice it unless it's pointed out to then. Some version give yet another in instead of if.)

    You will be in good company if you stretch grammar and meaning a bit to fit a tune.

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