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  1. #1
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Key Member
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      • English Teacher
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      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
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    Make a sentence / Make up a sentence

    Could you please help me clarify the following?

    1)If the task (for students) is to create true sentences about themselves, is it correct to use make sentences or make up sentences in the instructions for the task?
    2) If the task is just to think of new sentences making use of some phrases under study, is it better to use make sentences or make up sentences in the instructions for the task??
    3) If the students need to order words in jumbled sentences, is it correct to use make sentences or make up sentences in the instructions for the task?
    4) If one word is missing from each of a few sentences and the students need to drag and drop the given words in the right sentence (an interactive online task), should it be make the sentences or make up the sentences in the instructions for the task?

    Sorry for giving you too many situations, but I can't make out what verb should be used in each case. Make up means 'create something which is not true', so I'm struggling with these shades of meaning.
    Last edited by englishhobby; 11-Jul-2017 at 12:03.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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      • Retired English Teacher
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    Re: Make a sentence / Make up a sentence

    Use 'make sentences'.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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