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  1. #1
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    I was standing across the road from the building.

    1) I was standing across the road from the building.

    2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building.

    3) He was on the opposite road as we were.

    4) He was in his car across the road from the building.

    Could you please check my sentences?

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    1) I was standing across the road from the building.

    2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building.

    3) He was on the opposite road as we were.

    4) He was in his car across the road from the building.
    `

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    1) I was standing across the road from the building.

    2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building. I can't even work out what you're trying to say.

    3) He was on the opposite road as we were. He was on the opposite side of the road from us.

    4) He was in his car across the road from the building.

    Could you please check my sentences?
    See above. "Opposite road" doesn't make sense.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    Skrej's Avatar
    Skrej is offline Key Member
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

    I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    I agree that it's possible but I'll stake my house (if I had one) on the fact that that's not what Tufguy's trying to say.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

    I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.
    Road opposite would also work in some contexts, but it couldn't be dropped into #3.

  7. #7
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

    I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.



    http://static.panoramio.com/photos/o...l/26511031.jpg

    This is what I mean. If there are two parallel roads and I am standing by the left road (I do not know what is the way to describe this?) or the coming road and building is on "the side of going road" or "by the going road" then I have to say "I am standing across the road from the building". "I am standing on the opposite road" cannot be used am I correct?

    Did I write these sentences correctly? What is the term for "coming and going road" and "building is on the side of going road"? What is frontage road?
    Last edited by tufguy; 13-Jul-2017 at 07:23.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    You are standing on the opposite carriageway (BrE). However, you wouldn't be standing in the traffic! You would be standing on the pavement so you are simply "on the opposite side of the road".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. #9
    Skrej's Avatar
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Technically, that's still just one road with divided lanes, so no. I think you're still better off just saying you're standing across the road from the building. It doesn't really matter that you're across eight lanes of divided highway.

    If you're trying to cross the road, the traffic direction is relative to whichever way you're looking, so inbound/incoming and outbound/outgoing are fluid terms. If you really had to specify, I'd just say eastbound/westbound (or whichever direction the road runs) traffic.

    As for 'frontage road', it may be called other terms in other variants. See here.
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  10. #10
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: I was standing across the road from the building.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	worms.jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	5.3 KB 
ID:	2628

    Technically, that's still just one road with divided lanes, so no. I think you're still better off just saying you're standing across the road from the building. It doesn't really matter that you're across eight lanes of divided highway.

    If you're trying to cross the road, the traffic direction is relative to whichever way you're looking, so inbound/incoming and outbound/outgoing are fluid terms. If you really had to specify, I'd just say eastbound/westbound (or whichever direction the road runs) traffic.

    As for 'frontage road', it may be called other terms in other variants. See here.
    So can we say "I am standing by the 'eastbound road or westbound road or northbound road' or building by the eastbound road"?

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