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  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn is offline Key Member
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    Donít seek happiness(;?) seek meaning.

    1. Happiness depends on the inward conditions not on the external things.
    2. Don’t seek happiness (;?) seek meaning.
    3. Don’t impress people with your money and/or position, but with your character.

    Are those sentences correct English?
    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 12-Jul-2017 at 14:27.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: Donít seek happiness(;?) seek meaning.

    Delete the two definite articles in 1. Use the semi-colon in 2.
    ďEvery miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.Ē

    ó Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. #3
    agreva3 is offline Newbie
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    Re: Donít seek happiness(;?) seek meaning.

    I would agree that we should take out "the" from Sentence 1.



    I find that Sentence 2 has some flexibility.

    If we are talking about writing in an academic context or anywhere with people who are aware of formal writing, the semi-colon should be used.

    It seems, though, that many native English speakers do not understand the semi-colon, so seeing it can be taken as pretentious. In this case, it seems common to just use a comma. Formal and academic writers would probably call this a "comma splice," but it still seems common nonetheless.



    Sentence 3 seems fine, but it might be criticized for not reading smoothly (i.e., "clumsy") because of the "and/or." Maybe this could be a possible resolution:

    (3) Don't impress people with money or position, but with your character.

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