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  1. #1
    kompstar is offline Member
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    to travel into the city

    'Heavy snow disrupted travel into the city this morning.'

    What does 'travel into the city' mean? Does it mean
    a) travel inside the same city for example from one street to another
    b) travel from for example from city A to city B
    c) or something else?

  2. #2
    kompstar is offline Member
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    Re: to travel into the city

    Unfortunately, I don't know the context. The sentence comes from online dictionary http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...nglish/disrupt .

    But can you say does it snow in or outside the city?

    I can't translate this sentence correct. The problem is "into".

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: to travel into the city

    The "into the city" in your original refers to the direction of travel of the people whose journeys were disrupted by snow.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    kompstar is offline Member
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    Re: to travel into the city

    If I'd like to say that heavy snow disrupted travel inside the city I'd say:

    1. Heavy snow disrupted travel around the city this morning.
    or
    2.
    Heavy snow disrupted travel over the city this morning.
    or
    3.
    Heavy snow disrupted travel in the city this morning.

    Am I right?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 14-Jul-2017 at 07:26. Reason: Removed unnecessary line breaks.

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: to travel into the city

    For many (if not all) big cities, the primary traffic in the morning is people commuting into the city. Reverse in the afternoon/evening.

    Major routes (like those used for commuters) are the primary roads to receive attention during snow storms. If that travel is disrupted, it goes without saying that travel within the city, especially on secondary and neighborhood streets is disrupted even more.

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: to travel into the city

    Quote Originally Posted by kompstar View Post
    The sentence comes from online dictionary http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...nglish/disrupt .
    In future posts please put this information in post #1.

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