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    #1

    Thursday and champin

    Dear teachers,

    I was watching a movie when I heard the following:

    What's the champin about?
    It's Thursday.

    Could you please explain the relation between 'champin' and 'Thursday'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Thursday and champin

    If someone is eager or anxious to do something, they are said to be "champing at the bit." (The phrase comes from the gnawing or champing a horse does on the metal bit in his mouth when he's impatient.) Sometimes it's pronounced "champin'", dropping the final "g."

    I'm guessing that in the scenario you mentioned, someone has something exciting planned for Friday or the weekend, and his friend is asking why he's so restless or anxious. "Why are you champin'?" "Because it's only Thursday and I can't wait for Friday."

  2. rewboss's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Thursday and champin

    jiang, could you tell us a little more? What film did you hear this in? Can you describe the scene and perhaps some more of the dialogue?

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    #4

    Re: Thursday and champin


    Dear Quisch,

    First of all I'd like to thank you for your explanation of the phrase because I didn't know it until you explained it.
    Second, I am sorry I made a serious mistake. The word should have been 'champagne'. I wrote a wrong word and conincidently there is an English word 'champ'.

    So it should be:
    A: Hey, what's the champagne about?
    B: It's thursday.

    Best wishes,

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    If someone is eager or anxious to do something, they are said to be "champing at the bit." (The phrase comes from the gnawing or champing a horse does on the metal bit in his mouth when he's impatient.) Sometimes it's pronounced "champin'", dropping the final "g."

    I'm guessing that in the scenario you mentioned, someone has something exciting planned for Friday or the weekend, and his friend is asking why he's so restless or anxious. "Why are you champin'?" "Because it's only Thursday and I can't wait for Friday."

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    #5

    Re: Thursday and champin


    Dear rewboss,
    I am sorry I made a silly mistake. The word should have been 'champagne'. I wrote a wrong word and conincidently there is an English word 'champ'.

    The scene is as follows:

    A young guy and a girl fell in love with each other but the man misunderstood the girl so he left her. With the help of the man's friends they met again and the misunderstanding is cleared off. The dialogue took place at the end of the film when they were sailing. The whole dialogue is as follows:

    Man: Give you a hand?
    Girl: You just take it easy. I got everything under control.
    (The man took out a bottle of champagne)
    Girl: Hey, what's the champagne about?
    Man: it's Thursday.
    ( They drank champagne and kissed each other).

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    jiang, could you tell us a little more? What film did you hear this in? Can you describe the scene and perhaps some more of the dialogue?

  3. rewboss's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Thursday and champin

    The connection is in the minds of the people. Perhaps Thursday has some significance for them (maybe they met on a Thursday, for example), or perhaps there is no real reason for the champagne at all -- "it's Thursday" is as good a reason as any.

    If you want a complicated answer, there is a difference between "denotation" and "connotation". "Denotation" is what the words mean according to the dictionary. "Connotation" is what the words mean when you include past experience, shared information and other things not included in the dictionary.

    Consider the following exchange:

    "Is John here yet?"
    "Well, there is a blue Ford Escort outside."

    What does the answer have to do with the question? Well, nothing -- the answer denotes nothing more than that there is a blue Ford Escort outside. However, if you happen to know that John drives a blue Ford Escort, then the connotation is that either John or somebody who drives a similar car is here.

    Something similar may be going on in the dialogue you posted.

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    #7

    Re: Thursday and champin

    Dear rewboss,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    I'd like to ask a question as far as "denotation' and "connotation" are concerned:

    The dictionary meaning of 'downtown' is commercial center. But I was told in New York City the word means "police station". Is "police station" connotation?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss
    The connection is in the minds of the people. Perhaps Thursday has some significance for them (maybe they met on a Thursday, for example), or perhaps there is no real reason for the champagne at all -- "it's Thursday" is as good a reason as any.

    If you want a complicated answer, there is a difference between "denotation" and "connotation". "Denotation" is what the words mean according to the dictionary. "Connotation" is what the words mean when you include past experience, shared information and other things not included in the dictionary.

    Consider the following exchange:

    "Is John here yet?"
    "Well, there is a blue Ford Escort outside."

    What does the answer have to do with the question? Well, nothing -- the answer denotes nothing more than that there is a blue Ford Escort outside. However, if you happen to know that John drives a blue Ford Escort, then the connotation is that either John or somebody who drives a similar car is here.

    Something similar may be going on in the dialogue you posted.

  4. #8

    Re: Thursday and champin

    Hello, Rewboss. Good explanation of Connotation and denotation.

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