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  1. #1
    ambitious-girl's Avatar
    ambitious-girl is offline Senior Member
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    Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    could you please check this sentence?

    Integrating cities into a single neighborhood, encouraging people to use more public transports, and recycling everything from sewage to sandwich wrappers are measures that are being taken by planners, governments and architects around the globe.
    Last edited by ambitious-girl; 21-Jul-2017 at 07:30. Reason: Fixed layout problem

  2. #2
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    Re: Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    As far as the sentence goes it is well written and interesting to read. "Transports" should singular though.

    As to your content, I don't think this aspect is possible in reality - "Integrating cities into a single neighborhood". A neighbourhood (in Canadian English often we use the British spelling) is a very small part of a city. It usually has a distinct characteristic in architecture and structure. It has a feeling that people know each other or at least shop at small shops located in a small area. In my own city of Calgary, Alberta there are many unique areas that have developed slowly over the past 100 years or more.

    There are older sections of the city and other areas that are new developments. We have a single municipal government that is responsible for all the 1.25 million people living here as well as all services associated with the city. It is the consolidation of government services that I think you are trying to describe in your sentence. However, it is not a "single neighbourhood". That would be impossible to achieve.

  3. #3
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    Re: Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    Thanks teacher for your informative information. I think I have to rewrite my sentence into the following:

    Redesigning cities to integrate living and working areas into a single neighborhood, encouraging people to use more public transport, and recycling everything from sewage to sandwich wrappers are measures that are being taken by planners, governments and architects around the globe.

  4. #4
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    Re: Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    Again, you have a very well written interesting sentence, but it is the word "neighborhood" that bothers me.

    I think that is my problem, not yours. In my country, Canada, our cities are often made up of many cultures that exist side by side and we like the differences for the most part. We are a cultural mosaic, not a melting pot.

    I am guessing that your culture is more uniform in your cities. So in that respect, it is my background that interferes with my thoughts when I read your sentence.

    Your sentence is complex, interesting to read and well written in my opinion.

  5. #5
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    Re: Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    I am guessing that your culture is more uniform in your cities. So in that respect, it is my background that interferes with my thoughts when I read your sentence.
    Yes. In Tehran, the city where I live, I haven't seen any foreigners except a few tourist. I am not sure if this term 'foreigner' is appropriate or not.

  6. #6
    Lynxear's Avatar
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    Re: Integrating cities into a single neighborhood

    Yes. In Tehran, the city where I live, I haven't seen any foreigners except for a few tourists. I am not sure if this term 'foreigner' is appropriate or not.

    I have lived for short times in several countries and the local word for "foreigner" often takes on a negative context.

    In Japan, "gaijin" means "foreigner" but it carries a negative connotation to western ears.

    In Thai, "farang" means "foreigner". I lived in Thailand for 6 months and grew to dislike that word. If I was walking in the streets and I heard the word "farang" expressed by people around me, I knew I was the subject of the conversation. Often I was addressed simply as "farang" when they were calling me instead of by my real name or nickname, by people that I knew but were not my friends.

    In Canada we don't use the word "foreigner" a lot in conversation. We might say "foreign tourists" if that were the case or "immigrants" if they were coming to live in Canada or "refugees" if they were coming to Canada to escape hardships elsewhere. We would rarely if ever call a person a "foreigner" directly to their face. To do so would be impolite. I don't mean to say that all Canadians are polite though that is our reputation generally . We have bigots and rabble rousers (a person who incites a crowd to violence) as well, but thankfully they are a minority for the most part.

    So depending on what you are writing or saying and who the communication is directed to, be cautious on how you use the word "foreigner".
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

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