Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,367

    What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    Where I live, everything that is no longer working is spoilt. For example, My radio is spoiled, My watch is spoiled, My car is spoiled. My mobile is spoiled. (In fact, any device can be spoiled.)

    I believe native speakers do not use the word spoiled so liberally.

    May I know what terms native English speakers use in place of spoiled?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 23-Jul-2017 at 19:01.

  2. #2
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    "My phone is about as useful as tits on a nun."
    Good grief, Robert. You have watched The Sound of Music too many times.

    I use "on the fritz".
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 23-Jul-2017 at 22:25. Reason: Fixing typo

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,307

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    In BrE, we'd say "My mobile is broken/kaput/knackered/buggered/dead/screwed/f*cked", but not "spoiled/spoilt".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    Lynxear's Avatar
    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    492

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    "not working", "broken", "out of order", "malfunctioning", or:

    "My phone is about as useful as tits on a nun." And you're right; I at least do not use 'spoiled' in this way. Others might.
    Hahaha... Well Robert, I think you would get a negative reaction from any nun who reads/listens to that.

    Where I come from we would say "My phone is as useful as tits on a boar/bull."

    More to the question, I would use "spoiled" for the state of vegetables, children whose parents give them everything and concepts that are ruined by some means.

    "The lettuce is spoiled and not fit to be eaten."

    "I wish that spoiled brat would stop crying."

    "You spoiled my presentation with your stupid comments!"

    As far as malfunctioning equipment goes you could use the following "broken", "not working", "finished" and if you are really mad and not in the presence of polite company you could use the acronym "FUBAR" or "SNAFU". (actually SNAFU is not considered as obscene as it was decades ago.)

    "My phone is FUBAR!"

    "What a day! It is just one snafu after another with my phone."


    There are many ways to describe such situations. I have listed only a couple of them. We would never use "spoiled" though.
    Last edited by Lynxear; 24-Jul-2017 at 02:27.
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

  5. #5
    JMurray is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,114

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    not a teacher

    The examples that emsr2d2 gives are all to be heard in Aust/NZ English. A couple more that occur to me are 'stuffed' and 'on the blink'.
    It used to be very common to hear 'it's gone bung', but not so much these days.
    There's an old New Zealand form that was commonly expressed as "it's pukarooed, mate", from the Maori "pakaru", to break, smash. I heard it often in my youth, but I feel it's also less widespread now.

    tedmc: yes, I should have mentioned that, in line with emsr2d2's post, these are informal terms.
    Last edited by JMurray; 24-Jul-2017 at 04:40.

  6. #6
    tedmc is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    7,888

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    not a teacher

    The examples that emsr2d2 gives are all to be heard in Aust/NZ English. A couple more that occur to me are 'stuffed' and 'on the blink'.
    It used to be very common to hear 'it's gone bung', but not so much these days.
    There's an old New Zealand form that was commonly expressed as "it's pukarooed, mate", from the Maori "pakaru", to break, smash. I heard it often in my youth, but I feel it's also less widespread now.
    Those are the colloquial way of saying it.
    I guess the formal word for it is "out of order" or "not working". "Malfunctioning" does not mean something is not working but not as it is supposed to be.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  7. #7
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    "Malfunctioning" does mean something is not working.

  8. #8
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,085

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    "broken" is the most common way of saying this, in my experience. I've never heard "spoiled" use for machinery.

    Usually "spoiled" is used for food or drink (especially milk) that's gone bad. It also describes children who have been overindulged by their parents and as a result become narcissistic, ego-centric brats.
    Last edited by bubbha; 26-Jul-2017 at 12:30.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  9. #9
    tedmc is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    7,888

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    "Malfunctioning" does mean something is not working.


    malfunction

    • 1.
      (of a piece of equipment or machinery) fail to function normally or satisfactorily.

      An equipment could be working but not satisfactorily.


    Last edited by emsr2d2; 24-Jul-2017 at 12:20.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  10. #10
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: What do native English speakers use in place of 'spoiled'?

    I don't know if perhaps in Chinese you distinguish between functioning and working but in English "fail to function normally" means it is not working.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •