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  1. #1
    northpath is offline Member
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    ‘to cost’ VS ‘to come in at’

    I came across a sentence:
    That particular carpet comes in at around $40 a square yard.
    Why not simply:
    That particular carpet costs around $40 a square yard.
    When should I use ‘to come in at’ instead of ‘to cost’?
    Last edited by northpath; 26-Jul-2017 at 08:56.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: ‘to cost’ VS ‘to come in at’

    Quote Originally Posted by northpath View Post
    When should I should use ‘to come in at’ instead of ‘to cost’?
    Never. It's unnecessarily wordy.

    It's salesmen's jargon.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 26-Jul-2017 at 22:48.

  3. #3
    Polyester is offline Senior Member
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    Re: ‘to cost’ VS ‘to come in at’

    Can #2 mean "it cost around 40 dollar" by maker?

  4. #4
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: ‘to cost’ VS ‘to come in at’

    It could mean that it costs around $40 from the manufacturer.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  5. #5
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    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
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    Re: ‘to cost’ VS ‘to come in at’

    Both mean the same thing. However, a salesman does not like to use the word "cost" as this reminds the potential customer he is spending money. So he uses "comes in at" instead to avoid this.

    Rover KE is correct.
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

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