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  1. #1
    Kamshing is offline Junior Member
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    on board

    My company just employed a new staff.

    I used the following sentence to tell my friends in Facebook.

    1) John Wong was on board on 1st August, 2017.

    Dear teachers, please teach whether my 1) sentence is correct.


    Thank you.

    Kamshing

  2. #2
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
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    Re: on board

    John Wong came on board on 1st August, 2017.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: on board

    Or "was brought on board."

    But he's not "a new staff." He's just one person. "The staff" is everyone. You just employed a new member of staff, or staff member.

  4. #4
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: on board

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Or "was brought on board."

    But he's not "a new staff." He's just one person. "The staff" is everyone. You just employed a new member of staff, or staff member.
    Yes, "staff" is like "team": it's a word that describes a group of people.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: on board

    He is also a new employee.

  6. #6
    Polyester is offline Senior Member
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    Re: on board

    What's on board mean?

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: on board

    Hired and began working. It's a nautical metaphor. Imagine the company is a ship. You've hired a new crew member. He comes on board (the ship), is oriented/trained and begins working with the rest of your crew/team.

  8. #8
    Lynxear's Avatar
    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
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    Re: on board

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Hired and began working. It's a nautical metaphor. Imagine the company is a ship. You've hired a new crew member. He comes on board (the ship), is oriented/trained and begins working with the rest of your crew/team.
    "On board" in this context means as you have described.

    However, it also has another meaning when discussing business situation. There it means "coming to agreement" especially if the person involved initially was against the idea.

    For example:

    " I have talked to the ABC Company directors and explained the proposal in greater detail. I am pleased to say they are now in agreement , so all parties are on board with the proposal and we can proceed to the next phase."

    Again using the ship analogy mentioned by SoothingDave, everyone is now on the ship so it can begin its voyage.
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

  9. #9
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: on board

    It's trendy in Human Resources jargon now to speak of "onboarding" people, or the "onboarding" process.

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