Results 1 to 8 of 8

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 24
    #1

    Thumbs up ?

    HI!
    COULD YOU EXPLAIN ME Wich the reason is of adding "s" TO THE VERB IN THE THIRD PERSON

    Thank you for your help....
    Have a nice day.

  1. DavyBCN's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 346
    #2

    Re: ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Hernandez
    HI!
    COULD YOU EXPLAIN ME Wich the reason is of adding "s" TO THE VERB IN THE THIRD PERSON

    Thank you for your help....
    Have a nice day.
    A very interesting question , but I think the answer is that this is just what the English language does. I cannot think of any sensible reasons why - maybe someone else can. It is like asking why other languages do things differently.

  2. #3

    Re: ?

    Why? Who knows the origin of that and so many other rules. That is how English language developed.

  3. sheena55ro
    Guest
    #4

    Re: ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Hernandez
    HI!
    COULD YOU EXPLAIN ME Wich the reason is of adding "s" TO THE VERB IN THE THIRD PERSON

    Thank you for your help....
    Have a nice day.

    The reason dates back in the history of Old English language. It is called inflection. The old "th" came to be "s" nowadays. It is a very interesting and, at the same time, a very difficult subject or domain of study. Maybe the following lines will help you understand it.

    Inflection.
    Inflection is the process by which words change forms, as when you change the infinitive to be and turn it into am, is, are, were, being, been, and so on, or when you take a singular noun and make it plural. English pronouns change form according to person, number, and case — that is, the function they play in the sentence — producing I, me, my, mine.

    The "base" form of a verb is the infinitive. The base form of a noun is the singular.

    Modern English isn't a very "highly inflected" language — we tack an s onto the end of the infinitive to get our third-person singular present verb; we slap ed to the end of infinitives to get most of our past tenses; we paste ing to the infinitive to get the present participle. With nouns, we add an s to most singular nouns to get the plurals, apostrophe-s for singular possessives, and s-apostrophe for plural possessives. English adjectives and adverbs aren't inflected at all. A thousand years ago, Old English was much more highly inflected. We lost most of the inflections in the Middle English period, when word order took over their function. Plenty of languages, though, have more flexibility in word order because they show grammatical relations in their word forms. Those who've studied ancient Greek, Latin, or German will know that every noun and adjective can take dozens of forms. The list of forms an ancient Greek verb can take stretches into the hundreds. On the other hand, many of the East Asian languages are even less inflected than English: Chinese and Vietnamese have hardly any changes in word forms.

    I hope it helped you a little. Everything is related to the changes which occured in the English language centuries ago.


    All the best,
    Last edited by sheena55ro; 27-Jul-2006 at 22:24.

  4. Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 3,567
    #5

    Re: ?

    Saul,

    May I ask that you use a descriptive title for your threads. It is hard knowing which is which when they are all called '?'.


    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 24
    #6

    Question Re: ?

    I do not really what do you mean sorry. explain me in a different way please thank you...

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 309
    #7

    Re: ?

    saul,what Red5 means is that you should add a title to your questions rather than just putting a question mark "?" because there are a few now and we never know which one is which question!

  5. Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 3,567
    #8

    Re: ?

    Sorry if I was unclear. Janaina has explained it well.

    To see what we mean, have a look at a list of all of the discussions you have started: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/s...Saul+Hernandez


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •