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  1. #1
    Mike12345 is offline Member
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    you can you up

    You can you up

    Teachers, Is this sentence correct? In my opinion, I think it is wrong, for you up doesn't make sense.

  2. #2
    Mike12345 is offline Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Mr Piscean, The sentence is very popular in China. It means if you can do that thing, you do.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: you can you up

    It makes no sense in international English.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: you can you up

    It hasn't any inroads that I know of outside China.

  5. #5
    Mike12345 is offline Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Mr Piscean,I did not translate. There are many interesting English words in China. For example, " day day up, good good study", “people mountain people sea”,"Let me give some color see see", " long time no see"......

  6. #6
    Mike12345 is offline Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It hasn't any inroads that I know of outside China.

    Mr Tdol, why do you use "of" in this sentence?

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: you can you up

    None of those are English.
    "Long time no see" is occasionally used in English. It means "I haven't seen you for a long time". But it came into English via Chinglish.

  8. #8
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    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    None of those are English.
    "Long time no see" is occasionally used in English. It means "I haven't seen you for a long time". But it came into English via Chinglish.
    Well, Asian countries have many many funny examples where they brutally translate their language to English.

    But the problems go the other way too. In a marketing course that I took we were cautioned about using English words when advertising in a foreign country.

    On example of this came via a rather well known maker of women's hair products Miss Clairol. It was back in 1985 when I took this course. Clairol called their hair spray product "hair mist" and they decided to market this product in Germany. Sales were terrible and not what they expected for this rather good product. Then they were informed that "mist" was also a German word and it translated to "excrement" (to use a polite term). Who in their right mind would spray that on their head?
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

  9. #9
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    None of those are English.
    "Long time no see" is occasionally used in English. It means "I haven't seen you for a long time". But it came into English via Chinglish.
    The origins of "long time no see" are uncertain, but they are often ascribed to Chinese or American Indian speakers of pidgin English.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  10. #10
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: you can you up

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike12345 View Post
    Mr Tdol, why do you use "of" in this sentence?
    "know of" means "know about".
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

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