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    #1

    Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    Dear Sir, Madam,

    Thank you in advance for taking the time to read this post. I am interested in learning more about how we can create relationships betweencurriculum design concepts, philosophies and our teaching practices. Specifically, can those of us who hold different ideological philosophies on the definitionof education and the needs of our students contribute to meaningful dialogue tocreate better learning environments? If so, are there certain techniques (remain patient, open-minded, etc.) that work better than others to help facilitate this contentious conversation?

    1) When using a subject-centered approach to curriculum for teaching English, what are some ways that we can still engage students in the planning process?

    2) When using a learner-centered approach, is it better to engage our students by having them choose their preferred method of assessment such as, creating a student portfolio, self/peer evaluations, etc.?

    Thank you for your comments and feedback!

    Sincerely,

    Rory Stavinga
    Last edited by Learning2Design; 09-Aug-2017 at 12:52.

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    #2

    Re: Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    Quote Originally Posted by Learning2Design View Post
    Specifically,can those of us who hold different ideological philosophies on the definition of education and the needs of our students contribute to meaningful dialogue to create better learning environments?
    Only if the dialogue is meaningful. When the dialogue is intended to be one side surrendering, then it isn't a dialogue. I too see a lot of shouting across each other and trying to stifle opposing opinions nowadays. How different an ideological philosophy is OK to you? What are your limits? That might be a good place to start.
    Last edited by Tdol; 15-Aug-2017 at 09:25.

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    #3

    Re: Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    You might have noticed that when you copied and pasted your text, lots of spaces were lost (between words as well as after punctuation). Please click on Edit Post and add all the missing spaces. Thanks.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    Thank you for helping me! My internet is always finicky so I write my ideas first in a Word document and copy them over afterwards. I did not realize the information copied incorrectly. Once again thank you for your help!

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    #5

    Re: Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    Thank you for your response!

    Can you recommend a collaboration tool or strategy that has worked in situations where there has been contention? My head teacher has suggested using Edward de Bono's six thinking caps. Are there any other strategies that you can suggest for facilitating the conversation?
    On another note, I rephrased my previous questions and I was wondering if you could provide any input to the questions I am asking.

    How can teachers create classroom environments which focus on learner-centered approaches to education?
    What are different ways that teachers can encourage student participation within such environments



    Thank you in advance for your feedback and guidance!



    Cheers,

    Rory

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    #6

    Re: Learning to Design Curriculum for EFL/ESL/ELL

    I think a lot of this is the art of teaching, of creating an atmosphere where discussion can be free. I do tend to see thinking hats as a bit of a gimmick. An atmosphere of respect, where people genuinely listen first and respond, will go further IMO. Try comparing a CNN panel and a panel from NHK (the Japanese broadcaster); in the first, you'll see shouting down, but in the second you'll see people waiting for someone to end before responding. Show them this- they don't need to speak Japanese, but the cultural differences are stark. Don't interrupt; respect other opinions; and reply when it's your turn. Going back to the idea of turn-taking would be a good start. And, IMO, a better one than funny hats.

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