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  1. #1
    arjitsharma is offline Member
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    Don't you be thinking.

    1.Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you sir.
    2. Don't you think that I am going to call you sir.
    Do both sentences have the same meaning? Or 1 is used to intensify the sentence?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    I don't really understand what either sentence means. The second one is less grammatically incorrect. It sounds as if it is part of a longer dialogue. Can you give us some more context and explain what you're trying to say?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    Punctuation is missing from both sentences. For example, the first could be either Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you, sir or Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you "sir". Its meaning depends on the missing punctuation.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    arjitsharma is offline Member
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    I am afraid. I don't understand.

  5. #5
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    In this sentence, the speaker is discouraging the person s/he's talking to from expecting a phone call: Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you, sir.

    In this one the speaker tells the other person not to expect to be called "sir":
    Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you "sir".

    "Don't you be thinking that x" is a casual usage. In more formal speech you'd say "Don't think that x.​"
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  6. #6
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    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    Also, Don't you think that I am going to call you, sir? and Don't you think that I am going to call you "sir"? are different in meaning from those two sentences GoesStation explained above.

    (The original sentences are imperatives, though.
    GS's second explanation (in #5) is likely, I guess.)

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    Adding you to an imperative can make it more emphatic- you'll hear parents saying don't you dare to children. The first sounds like a regional form to me.

  8. #8
    arjitsharma is offline Member
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    The first sounds like a regional form. I don't understand it. Does the first sentence is used in a particular place?

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    I think it may be used in some areas of the UK, where I am from.

  10. #10
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: Don't you be thinking.

    Quote Originally Posted by arjitsharma View Post
    I am afraid. I don't understand.
    Say "I'm afraid I don't understand".

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