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  1. #1
    Maybo is offline Senior Member
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    much of which

    There are plenty of opportunities for strolls in the nearby Chiltern Hills, much of which is designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

    Is "which" refer to Chiltern Hills?
    Why do we need comma before "much....." ?
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know!

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: much of which

    What is the source of the quoted sentence?

  3. #3
    Maybo is offline Senior Member
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    Re: much of which

    An ad from 《Lonely Planet》
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know!

  4. #4
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: much of which

    Can you be a bit more specific? Do you have a link?

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: much of which

    Quote Originally Posted by Maybo View Post

    Is Does "which" refer to the Chiltern Hills?
    Why do we need a comma before "much....."?
    See above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #6
    Maybo is offline Senior Member
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    Re: much of which

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    Can you be a bit more specific? Do you have a link?
    There is no link for the sentence.

    "A crisp, clear December day makes for prime walking time, particularly when you can warm yourself by the pub fire or loll in a roll-top bath afterwards. There are plenty of opportunities for strolls in the nearby Chiltern Hills, much of which is designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty."

    I don't understand why we need a comma to separate this sentence. Can I delete it?
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know!

  7. #7
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: much of which

    That means the comma is required there, doesn't it?

  8. #8
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: much of which

    Quote Originally Posted by Maybo View Post
    ... the nearby Chiltern Hills, much of which is designated
    For the benefit of learners who may be wondering about subject-verb agreement in the above, the word "area" is implied after "Hills". In other words, we are talking about the Chiltern Hills area (or region), not about individual hills.

  9. #9
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: much of which

    teechar is correct.

    Specifically, the Chilterns is one of Britain's Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

  10. #10
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: much of which

    I think it is safe to say that Chiltern Hills is singular because it's a place name. I didn't know exactly what it was until I read the comments from teechar and Rover, but I was confident it was a name of a place.
    I think the same goes for Beverly Hills in the U.S. (grammatically, of course.)

    (Edit)
    However, in this article, the Chiltern Hills is plural. It says The Chiltern Hills form ... They are ...
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 18-Aug-2017 at 16:13.

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