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  1. #1
    shimacatu_sa's Avatar
    shimacatu_sa is offline VIP Member
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    Leave out

    Hi, I have two questions about "leave out".

    1. When I use "leave out" in place of "omit" in the sentence below, which preposition is correct, of or from? I believe "of" is correct to use, but would like to know if "from" is also OK.

    Don't omit his name from the list.
    Don't leave his name out of/from the list.


    2. Can I change the word order in the following sentence?

    A. Don't leave his name out of the list.
    B. Don't leave out his name of the list.

    For some reason, B sounds a little clumsy to me and "Don't leave out his name from list" sounds more flowing.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Leave out

    1. No, "from" is not OK. "Don't leave his name off of the list" is the way I'd say it.

    2. For B, use "from" or "on."

  3. #3
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    Re: Leave out

    I would say, "Don't leave his name off the list." (Not 'off of').
    I am not a teacher

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Leave out

    We Americans like our "off ofs."

  5. #5
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Re: Leave out


  6. #6
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Leave out

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    And we elderly Brits hate them.
    I wanted to reply with something snarky, but then I realized that Get off your high hat!​ is the only natural way to say that expression in American English.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. #7
    shimacatu_sa's Avatar
    shimacatu_sa is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Leave out

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post

    "Leave off" may work, but why use the negative?
    I appreciate your suggestion. I now realize that I should use positive when asking someone not to do something. It sounds more encouraging and pleasant. I will keep your advice in mind.Thank you.

  8. #8
    shimacatu_sa's Avatar
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    Re: Leave out

    Thank you for answering my questions. Please let me make sure that I followed all your advice correctly.

    The sentences below are acceptable:

    Don't leave his name off the list.
    Don't leave his name off of the list. (American English)
    Don't leave out his name from the list.
    Don't leave out his name on the list.

  9. #9
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Leave out

    Quote Originally Posted by shimacatu_sa View Post
    Thank you for answering my questions. Please let me make sure that I followed all your advice correctly.

    The sentences below are acceptable:

    Don't leave his name off the list.
    Don't leave his name off of the list. (American English)
    Don't leave out his name from the list.
    Don't leave out his name on the list.
    See above. "Leave out" is a phrasal verb which does not normally allow a following preposition. (I wrote "normally" but in fact I can't think of a case where a following preposition is possible.)
    I am not a teacher.

  10. #10
    shimacatu_sa's Avatar
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    Re: Leave out

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post

    "Leave out" is a phrasal verb which does not normally allow a following preposition.
    Thank you. Initially, I wanted to know what prepositions are appropriate for "leave out" in general.
    Your explanation is very clear to me. I will not try to use a preposition with "leave out" from now on.

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