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  1. #1
    kadioguy is offline Key Member
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    if I'd wanted to

    In the PEU third edition, Unit 124.4, it says:
    Could have + past participle means 'would have been allowed'.

    I could have kissed her if I'd wanted to.
    -----------
    1.
    'if I'd wanted to' = 'if I would wanted to', so why not if I would want to? (after 'would', use an infinitive without 'to')

    2.
    If I say 'I could have kissed her if I wanted to.', does it mean the same?
    --------
    Would you be so kind as to help me?
    Thanks!

    PS I also posted the same question on this, but all of your answers are unique to me. Hope we can discuss with each other. Thank you.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. #2
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: if I'd wanted to

    1 No, it isn't "if I would wanted to". It is "if I had wanted to".

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: if I'd wanted to

    I could kiss her if I wanted to.

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