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  1. #1
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    There is a friend of my friend's. He took my friend to his ancestral village. While they were roaming there he showed my friend the land that he owned (his ancestral property). He told him that "It was his land up to the point my friend could see" or "The land was his as far as my friend could see" or "It was his land from the place where they standing up to horizon".

    Please check my sentences.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Please give your friend and his friend names. Like your threads with "that person", it gets very confusing (and tiresome) to keep reading the same impersonal nouns through your pieces.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Please give your friend and his friend names. Like your threads with "that person", it gets very confusing (and tiresome) to keep reading the same impersonal nouns through your pieces.
    There is a friend of my friend's named Franklin (I am using these names instead of Indian names). Franklin took my friend Arnold to his ancestral village. While they were roaming there Franklin showed my friend the land that he owned (his ancestral property). Franklin told Arnold that "It was his land up to the point my friend could see" or "The land was his as far as my friend could see" or "It was his land from the place where they standing up to horizon".

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    There is no reason to start with "There is a friend of my friend" at all. Try "My friend Arnold has a friend called Franklin". From then on, you can refer to them by name or using a pronoun.

    Your use of quotation marks when you're not writing reported speech is getting very confusing. After "Franklin told Arnold that" you need to just carry on without quotation marks. If you want to quote his actual words, you need to say "Franklin said to Arnold" and then put his words in quotation marks.

    Who owns/owned the land?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    There is no reason to start with "There is a friend of my friend" at all. Try "My friend Arnold has a friend called Franklin". From then on, you can refer to them by name or using a pronoun.

    Your use of quotation marks when you're not writing reported speech is getting very confusing. After "Franklin told Arnold that" you need to just carry on without quotation marks. If you want to quote his actual words, you need to say "Franklin said to Arnold" and then put his words in quotation marks.

    Who owns/owned the land?
    My friend Arnold has a friend called Franklin. Franklin took Arnold to his ancestral village. While they were roaming there Franklin showed Arnold the land that he owned (his ancestral property). Franklin told Arnold that "It was Franklin's land up to the point Arnold could see" or "The land was Franklin's as far as Arnold could see" or "It was Franklin's land from the place where they were standing up to the horizon".

  6. #6
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
    Matthew Wai is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    All the land Arnold could see there belonged to Franklin.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. #7
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    All the land Arnold could see there belonged to Franklin.
    But how would a person tell this to others in English?

  8. #8
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    As the friendships are irrelevant, cut them out altogether:

    Franklin took me to his village. While we were walking about, he told me that the land (for) as far as I could see belonged to him.

    We spend so much time sorting out problems in irrelevant phrases that we sometimes never manage to get round to what seems to be your original question,
    Can we say "He told me the land for as far as I could see "belonged to him" or "Was his"?

    Can we also say "The land for as far as I could see belonged to him" or "The land as far as I could see belonged to him"?

  9. #9
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Could you please check these sentences as well?

  10. #10
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: It was his land up to the point my friend could see

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Yes, if you wish.
    No, I am going to use your version only but I am asking about these. Are these not natural?

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