Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Bassim is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bosnian
      • Home Country:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,948

    As the guests talked lively around

    I am wondering if my sentence is grammatically correct.

    As the guests talked lively around the table, Bob clinked his glass with a teaspoon to announce his speech.

  2. #2
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Iraq
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    11,465

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    "Lively" is not an adverb, Bassim. Try again.

  3. #3
    Bassim is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bosnian
      • Home Country:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,948

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    I have to admit I am not sure if I know how to make an adverb of lively. But let me try.

    Could I write like this:

    As the guests talked in a lively manner around the table....

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,365

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Or maybe "As the guests had a lively discussion/conversation/debate around the table ...". You could also put "at the table" directly after "As the guests".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    31,886

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    The adverb livelily does exist but is nothing like as popular as it was 200 years ago and is best avoided.

  6. #6
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Maybe this is a cultural difference but I don't know what a teaspoon is. I'm only aware of the measuring spoon.

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    31,886

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Here's a cup and saucer with a teaspoon:



    I know you have them in America.

  8. #8
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I know you have them in America.
    Just from the name, I would guess it is a small spoon you use for tea. As you know we don't usually accurately name our silverware. Here are a few names I have heard "coffee spoon", "dessert spoon", "small spoon." I'm pretty sure I have also heard "butter spoon". The only thing that we name accurately is the teaspoon we use for measuring.

  9. #9
    andrewg927 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,325

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    And the 15,000+ citations in COCA.
    If you click on the word itself, you will find out the majority of the citations are related to recipes that call for a measured teaspoon.

  10. #10
    Lynxear's Avatar
    Lynxear is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    492

    Re: As the guests talked lively around

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewg927 View Post
    Maybe this is a cultural difference but I don't know what a teaspoon is. I'm only aware of the measuring spoon.



    A teaspoon is a unit of measure for baking specifically and cooking in general. It is the small spoon used to stir coffee or tea. It might not be an American custom but In Canada during wedding receptions, the clinking of a glass or teacup with a teaspoon is used to call the room to attention. Sometimes it is used when the toasts to the bride and groom are made. At other times it is used to make the bride and groom rise from their seats and kiss each other in front of the audience. This can happen over and over again until everyone gets tired of it.
    Experience is recognizing a mistake the second time you make it.
    You don't go to an Englishman when you want good pierogi.

    - Wisdom from my father

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •