Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    carat is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    59

    come & coming

    Have a look at these sentences and my explanations. Tell me and correct me if I'm wrong.

    a. These children come from a slum.
    b. These children are coming from a slum.

    And here are my explanations for the two sentences above.
    a. All the children that came from a slum are here now. Their number is constant.
    b. The children are not all here now. Their number is still growing.
    Last edited by carat; 27-Aug-2017 at 19:29. Reason: typo

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,295

    Re: come & coming

    Quote Originally Posted by carat View Post
    Have a look at these sentences and my explanation understanding of them. Tell me and correct me if I'm wrong.

    a. These children come from a slum.
    b. These children are coming from a slum.

    And here is my explanation for understanding of the tow two sentences above.

    a. All the children that came from a slum are here now. Their number is constant.
    b. The children are not all here now. Their number is still growing.
    Unfortunately, you're wrong.

    "These children come from a slum" simply means that a specific group of children, which has already been identified in a previous sentence, live in a slum.
    - Do those children come from the posh part of town?
    - No, they come from a slum.

    "These children are coming from a slum" is an unusual sentence. I can only imagine it being used when someone can see a group of children who are on the move, walking from somewhere to somewhere.
    - I can see a group of children walking down that hill. Are they coming from school?
    - No, they're coming from a slum.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    carat is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    59

    Re: come & coming

    @emsr2d2
    Okay my understanding of the two sentences was dead wrong. On the other hand with your good description of a possible scenario

    for my second sentence, the situation might not be so unusual.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,295

    Re: come & coming

    Quote Originally Posted by carat View Post
    @emsr2d2
    Okay, my understanding of the two sentences was dead wrong. On the other hand, with your good description of a possible scenario for my second sentence, the situation might not be so unusual.
    Note my addition of commas to your post.

    I only said that the second sentence was unusual because even the situation I described would be fairly uncommon. I should probably have said "unlikely" rather than "unusual". Bear in mind, though, that I live in a country that does not (officially) have slums. Perhaps such conversations are more common in other countries.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •