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  1. #1
    popri is offline Member
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    beginning to want to, starting to want to, come to want to

    Hi, I need your help.
    I don't hear "beginning to want to", "starting to want to", and "come to want to", but are these expressions used in everyday conversation?

    1. I've come to want to read the book.
    2. I'm beginning to want to eat ice cream.
    3. I'm starting to want to eat ice cream.

    Are three expressions written above correct in daily conversation?

    There is a good expression that applies to any case in my mother tongue, but is there such an expression in English? Or do you always choose an expression such as "have an urge to", and "have a craving for" among lots of expressions?

  2. #2
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    probus is online now Moderator
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    Re: beginning to want to, starting to want to, come to want to

    1. I've come to want to read the book.
    2. I'm beginning to want to eat ice cream.
    3. I'm starting to want to eat ice cream.

    These are all grammatically correct, but they are not naturally used in the contexts you propose.

    "I have come to ..." indicates that you initially disagreeed with a proposition, but were later won over.

    "Beginning to" and "starting to" are identical, but their use with "want to" seems unusual to me. More naturally, for example, "I used to disagree with his position, but I am beginning/starting to understand it.

  3. #3
    popri is offline Member
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    Re: beginning to want to, starting to want to, come to want to

    Thank you for your explaining.
    Could it be possible for anyone to suggest a correct sentence for each example?
    I’ve checked several words in the dictionary, but I’m not sure which word is suitable.

    1. The book has made me want to read.
    2. All of a sudden I have an urge to eat ice cream.
    (I want to emphasize I didn’t feel anything first but changed suddenly.)

  4. #4
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: beginning to want to, starting to want to, come to want to

    Quote Originally Posted by popri View Post
    1. The book has made me want to read.
    2. All of a sudden I have an urge to eat ice cream.
    (I want to emphasize I didn’t feel anything first but changed suddenly.)
    Both sentences are grammatically correct. The second expresses what you're aiming for.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    popri is offline Member
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    Re: beginning to want to, starting to want to, come to want to

    Thank you for your comment. But your “grammatically correct” is something.
    How about these?

    1. An interesting illustration of the book cover has made me want to read it.
    2. I was on a diet. But one day, I suddenly had an urge to eat ice cream and went to buy it.

    How natural do they sound to you?
    Last edited by popri; 31-Aug-2017 at 22:57.

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